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Morning Catholic must-reads: 07/03/13

A daily guide to what’s happening in the Catholic Church

By on Thursday, 7 March 2013

Cardinals attend yesterday's prayer service at St Peter's (CNS)

Cardinals attend yesterday's prayer service at St Peter's (CNS)

The College of Cardinals gathered in St Peter’s Basilica yesterday evening for an hour of prayer in union with the Church throughout the world.

American Cardinal Roger Mahony has defended his handling of clerical abuse in an interview with the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera.

Friends of Mother Teresa have criticised a study by two Canadian researchers claiming that her saintliness was a myth.

Rocco Palmo, George Weigel and Sister Mary Walsh reflect on the cardinals’ decision to stop speaking to the media.

Sandro Magister explains why he thinks Cardinal Timothy Dolan is now the front-runner to be pope.

Cardinal Dolan invites Catholics to join him in a novena to St Joseph to “get us an inspired new Successor of St Peter“.

And a YouTube user has created a song inspired by “Y.M.C.A” by the Village People to promote his candidate for pope (video).

Follow me on Twitter @lukecoppen for updates throughout the day.

  • Stw_sandbach

    I think it very unlikely that Cardinal Dolan would be elected Pope; a Pope from the USA would just be uncomfortably close to the last superpower for too many people.

  • Jeannine Steward

    The American cardinals’ press conference is a bit unusual but I like the idea about keeping the Conclave procedures as transparent as possible without disregarding their oaths & using it as evangelizing moments with the press. Keeping nonconfidential information secret only creates conspiracy theories from the media. I think George Weigel’s article is correct about this situation & I usually do not agree with him on many issues.

  • Nat_ons

    A point-by-point conference on our medical treatments might be interesting to many, even if only the non-essential stuff – like what soap was provided in the hospital room, who one thinks will be best doctor, whether Health Care Reform should oblige Catholic Hospital Services to provide abortions .. etc.

    The media also has a distinct agenda – especially hyped on the chit-chat of ex-Catholic/ non-orthodox: free-thinking/ anti-establishment theologians pumped up to adrenaline highs by flexing their speech muscles and itching digits to the absolute and utter max.

    So no; there are reasons for privacy – even if it inconveniences the public’s craving for ‘news’; the best of these reasons apply to our medical treatment, bank account, public records, and sacramental confessions, papal elections et al.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/religion/9591600/The-16-people-selecting-the-next-Archbishop-of-Canterbury.html

    There may be reasons to have complete openness on the selection of a nation’s secular leaders – even those concerned with its State religion – but not religious leaders per se. No doubt a free vote (non-vote) election would be more democratic and in keeping with the open information and media-friendly forms of public-interest today, but not really Christian or sacramental. For me this reeks of the stultifying and unedifying manner of US politics with its caucuses and primaries, jockeying for positions, setting out programmes (on TV); that at least is something the media can get its teeth into, yet really, the shuffling, bumbling, canvassing and politicking of the Anglican General Synod defies belief; but giving national Catholic bishops groups .. especially the Cardinals .. another excuse to primp and preen opinions in public could only beggar belief.

  • Jeannine

    How are we ever going to evangelize the “pagans” if we don’t meet them on their level & clarify the many misconceptions that they, the media, have on the inner workings of the Catholic Church? It can be done without compromising the confidentiality oaths.

    “…another excuse to primp and preen opinions in public could only beggar belief.” At least the American cardinals are not sharing secret information with the press in the back alleys that some of the other cardinals are doing!