The author explains why she believes her book has helped spark resistance to the 'gender revolution'

I blogged about Gabriele Kuby’s book The Global Sexual Revolution: Destruction of Freedom in the Name of Freedom, here. Her book explains why the traditional distinction between men and women is under such attack today in the West and why for instance in Germany today peaceful demonstrations on behalf of family values now need heavy police protection. Indeed, as Kuby points out, anyone who believes in a divine purpose for men and for women is now labelled a “religious fundamentalist” or a “biological, sexist fundamentalist.”

Kuby is a convert. I asked her what led to her own conversion. She tells me that she had been searching for God for more than 20 years down the wrong paths, within esoteric philosophies and psychology. Her marriage had broken down and her life was in crisis. Alone with three teenage children, a young woman rang her doorbell and told her to pray. She prayed a novena – in front of a Buddhist statue – and by the end she knew she would become a Catholic. Her conversion led to speaking and writing about her new-found faith and about the global sexual revolution.

How was her book received in Germany? Kuby replies, “The mainstream media tried to block it by not reviewing it. Nonetheless it has had six editions in two years and has been translated into seven languages so far.” She thinks the book has helped spark resistance to the “gender revolution”.

Could she expand on this resistance? “Wherever I go I meet Christians who are involved in this cultural battle, despite the fact that money and power are in the hands of the other side. Nobody can stop us, as Christians, from our faith, hope and love of God. The course of history is in God’s hands.”

She adds, “We will encounter fear, insecurity and risk. They can only be overcome by prayer. If we sincerely want to work for the kingdom of God, we will find a way. God needs us and will provide the grace necessary.”

Where does the Church’s future lie? Kuby mentions the former Cardinal Ratzinger’s phrase about “creative minorities” of Christians in Europe. She adds that although the West blackmails Africa to adopt the LGTBI agenda, the continent is a “great hope for Christianity and [Guinean] Cardinal Sarah a bright light for the Church.” She affirms: “We can lose our life but not our hope.”