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Benedict XVI names 22 new cardinals

By on Friday, 6 January 2012

Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Twenty-two Church leaders will become cardinals at a consistory on February 18, Benedict XVI announced today.

The Pope made the announcement at the midday Angelus for the celebration of the Feast of the Epiphany.

The new cardinals are:

1) Archbishop Fernando Filoni, prefect of the Congregation for the Evangelisation of Peoples;

2) Archbishop Manuel Monteiro de Castro, Major Penitentiary;

3) Archbishop Santos Abril Y Castellò, Archpriest of the Basilica of Saint Mary Major;

4) Archbishop Antonio Maria Veglio, president of the Pontifical Council for the Pastoral Care of Migrants and Itinerant People;

5) Archbishop Giuseppe Bertelli, president of the Pontifical Commission for Vatican City State and President of the Governorate of the same State;

6) Archbishop Francesco Coccopalmerio, president of the Pontifical Council for Legislative Texts;

7) Archbishop João Bráz de Aviz, prefect of the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life;

8) Archbishop Edwin O’Brien, Pro Grand Master of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem;

9) Archbishop Domenico Calcagno, president of the Administration of the Patrimony of the Apostolic See;

10) Archbishop Giuseppe Versaldi, president of the Prefecture for Economic Affairs of the Holy See;

11) His Beatitude George Alencherry, Major Archbishop of Ernakulam-Angamaly of the Syro Malabar;

12) Archbishop Thomas Christopher Collins of Toronto;

13) Archbishop Dominik Duka of Prague;

14) Archbishop Willem Jacobus Eijk of Utrecht;

15) Archbishop Giuseppe Betori of Florence;

16) Archbishop Timothy Dolan of New York;

17) Archbishop Rainer Maria Woelki of Berlin;

18) Archbishop John Tong Hon of Hong Kong;

19) His Beatitude Lucian Muresan, Major Archbishop of Fagaras and Alba Julia of the Romanians;

20) Fr Julien Ries, priest of the Diocese of Namur and professor emeritus of history of religions at the Catholic University of Louvain;

21) Fr Prospero Grech, OSA, Professor Emeritus of various Roman universities and Consultant to the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith;

and 22) Fr Karl Becker, SJ, Professor Emeritus of the Pontifical Gregorian University, Consultant for many years the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

  • Mifsudl

    It is with great pleasure and satisfaction that I receive the news of the election of 22 new cardinals by Pope Benedict today. My congratulations to the elected cardinals and especially to my dear friend and co-national, Fr. Prosperous Grech O.S.A
    This prelate is well known not only in Vittoriosa, his hometown in Malta,and especially within the Augustinian Order, in Malta and Rome but also world-wide, as a biblical scholar and an authority on Patristics theology. He is also well known as a photographer, especially by his famous and interesting collection of photos depicting the daily life under the colonnade of St. Peter’ in Rome.
    Sincere congratulations on my behalf on behalf of the Maltese Church and the people of Malta and Gozo.

    Mgr. Lawrence Mifsud. (Malta)

  • geoffreysmith1

    No red hat for our Vin, once again.  It should be obvious by now that he’s in Benny’s bad books for allowing those ‘gay’ Masses at Warwick Street.
    He should resign and make way for someone who is worthy to receive such an honour.

     

  • Raphael20

    I don’t think Vincent can be a Cardinal yet as Cormac is still our legitimate Cardinal for the Archdiocese and is still young enough to vote in a papal election.

  • geoffreysmith1

    I thought Vincent Nichols was the Archbishop of Westminster.
    Cormac will be 80 in a few months time.  Realistically, he will not be voting in the next papal election.

  • Raphael20

    Vincent is Archbishop, but Cormac was granted the title Cardinal whilst he was Archbishop and will remain so until he either dies or retires regardless of whether he is still Archbishop, in which case the “Cardinal-ship” will most likely pass to Vincent.

  • Eugene

    Cardinal Egan, former Archbishop of New York, is aged 79; maybe Vin is just too awful for a red hat, but then Cormac got one…

  • Jamesasteel

    (Un) fortunately this does not “pass” on to the next incumbent of the see,
    The call to be a cardinal is something different

  • nigel

     Cardinal Egan is 80 on April 2nd, Cardinal Murphy-O’Connor not till August. Archbishop Nichols will be in the next list, but that won’t be before November 2013 at the earliest, however Pope Benedict is stronger than some would give him credit so there is time enough for him to participate in the conclave for Benedict’s eventual successor.

  • Raphael20

    Oh really ? How so ? I thought it was kind of an automatic type thing.

  • Anonymous

    Egan’s younger than
    Murphy O’ Connor, and Dolan still got the red hat…

  • Anonymous

    Cardinals don’t retire. They do, however, become ineligible to vote once they turn 80.

  • Anonymous

    It’s not. Cardinals are created by the pope. Certain sees are regarded as cardinalitial, Westminster amongst them, but there’s nothing to stop a pope from choosing another English bishop to give the rank of cardinal to instead. Your Holiness, if you are reading this, please can you give a red hat to the bishop of Shrewsbury?

  • Anonymous

    Not only for that, I should say. His failure to oppose the government strongly on civil unions/gay marriage, his lack of encouragement for the EF, and many other things too.

  • Anonymous

    Let’s hope he’s not on the next list.

  • Anonymous

    I, too, am pleased to see a Maltese cardinal elevated. The islands are so faithful and rarely receive the recognition they deserve for this.

  • David B McGinnity

    How ignorant and disrespectful you are. There already is a Cardinal: Cormac Murphy-O’Connor who holds that post until he is 75 and retires. Then Archbishop Vincent Nichols will hold that venerable position. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, even the crass and the stupid, but what good have you done other than expose yourself as a witless fool.

  • David B McGinnity

    ERROR
    I ought ot have written aged 80 instead of 75 as the age of retirement for cardinals.

  • Anonymous

    Yes, Mr McGinnity, you certainly should have written 80 instead of 75.  You should also have pointed out that cardinals do not ‘retire’, they become ineligible to vote in a conclave.
    You were saying something about “a witless fool”?

  • Anonymous

    All in all, Nichols is a great disappointment, to say the least.  I expect Birmingham were delighted to see the back of him.

  • Anonymous

    Let’s hope he reaches 75 before the next list!

  • Anonymous

    I quote:

    “Archbishop Nichols supported the unsuccessful effort to have Catholic adoption agencies exempted from sexual orientation regulations.[34] His position was qualified by his statement during a BBC interview that he would not oppose adoption by a gay person that was single. Mary Ann Sieghart, a Catholic journalist, commenting for The Times on Nichols’ statements on the subject, observed that “had the Catholic position been more hardline, it might have stood more of a chance. But once Vincent Nichols, the Archbishop of Birmingham, admitted on Tuesday’s Newsnight that his agencies were happy to place children with single gay people, but not couples, his argument fell apart. Surely two parents are better than one? If single homosexuals are acceptable, why not a couple committed to each other?”  ” (Wikipedia)

    This is why Archbishop Nichols is most unlikely to receive a red hat.  He cannot defend the Catholic faith.

  • David B McGinnity

    The Pope does accept resignations from office in accordance with canons 411 and 401 para. 2 of the Code of Canon Law. Cormac Murphy O’Connor submitted his resignation upon reaching his 75th birthday, and it was accepted on 3 April 2009 by Pope Benedict who then appointed Vincent Nichols as the new archbishop. I do not feel it appropriate to play “one-up-man-ship” games and ‘split hairs’ with semantics. Cormac Murphy O’Connor did resign (retire from office). I was correct in the first place about the age of retirement being 75. Either way, nothing excuses your rudeness and disrespect. However, if you need to have the last word and have the need to be right, that is alright by me.

  • geoffreysmith1

    Bishops retire from office at 75; cardinals remain cardinals.  That is the difference.

    “Either way, nothing excuses your rudeness and disrespect.”

    I think this admonition applies to you more than to me.

  • Raphael20

    Mark Davies ? Yeah, I met him a couple of weeks ago. Really nice guy. Didn’t stop smiling the whole time I saw him. :D

    I do realise the Bishop of Rome chooses Cardinals, I just assumed he would naturally pick Vincent after Cormac, but I didn’t realise he could give it to someone else.

  • Mark Castilano

    You do the catholic church proud in it’s demise and dissolution. Keep going and we all will soon embrace the protestant faith. You are a gem and the church needs you.

  • Anonymous

    What on earth are you talking about?

  • Mark Castilano

    Your views hardly represent the pristine tenets of the teachings of Jesus Christ. You are a supersilious bigot.

  • Anonymous

    Why so, Mr C?
    Don’t you agree that the teaching of Christ is repeated in the teaching of the Catholic Church?
    I uphold the teaching of the Church in every respect.  Regrettably, Archbishop Nichols does not appear to do so.  Hence, my suggestion that he should resign.
    On what point do you beg to differ?

  • Mark Castilano

    Referring to the Pope as Benny and the Archbishop as Vin is more in keeping with public house repartee than being a good catholic. Such name calling is highly disrespectful and is indicative of poor character and poor education.It also offends the tenets of the eight commandment about calumny and detraction. You have not put forward a cogent philosophical or theological argument to support your assertion, you have just resorted to hostile rhetoric probably because you are angry with the whole world over some petty matter.

  • Anonymous

    It is a matter of opinion whether the affectionate terms I use to refer to the Pope and the Archbishop of Westminster are disrespectful or sinful.
    My assertion is based on the experience of Catholics in the Westminster diocese, and needs no arguments to substantiate it.

  • Mark Castilano

    Yes, you sound to be infallible, the pope should watch out for his job. Oh! Do have the last word?

  • GFFM

    I’ve followed Dolan’s career since he was in St. Louis and his work has been underwhelming. It is quite safe to say that he has been a careerist cleric and was a lousy pick for Archbishop of New York after a lack luster, place-holding appointment in Milwaukee. He is always late to the table defending very basic Church teaching. Case in point: the gay marriage law in New York state. He is avuncular, but rarely says anything of real substance. Chaput should have been assigned to New York. In a very real sense Chaput is the most substantial voice within the American church and has been for more crystalline in his teaching concerning the essential and primary issues of our time. He has been unflinching unlike Dolan, Rigali, Mohoney, and George. Moreover, Chaput has a far greater command of the challenge a declining and evermore relativist culture in the West. 

  • Anonymous

    More to the point:  It is not that Archbishop Vincent Nichols ought to resign, but that Pope Benedict XVI should remove him from office forthwith and put in his place a leader who would uphold the teachings of the Church in the manner expected.
    The Pope has the authority to do it, and Pope Pius V would certainly have done it.

  • Alan

    English and Welsh Catholics have a right to feel aggrieved about this.  I doubt if Italy has many more mass-going practising Catholics than we do, yet there are dozens of Italian cardinals while we are foobed off with one or even none (as was the case for some time after Basil Hume died).  Shouldn’t the number of cardinals per country bear some relation to the number of practising Catholics?

  • Anonymous

    So, what are you going to do?  Organise a head count?
    You are speculating, Alan, even though I agree with your argument that there should be a fair representation in the SCC.
    Ideally, I would like to see the SCC abolished and the papal franchise extended to include all the bishops of the Church.  All the bishops are the successors of the Apostles, and I consider that they should all have a say in the election of the next Bishop of Rome.

  • Anonymous

    Pope Bl. John Paul II removed a bishop from office, that ghastly French bishop whose name I have thankfully forgotten.
    There is a precedent for what you suggest, but not even +Nichols has plumbed the depths of that bishop, in my opinion.

  • Anonymous

    Did Dolan manage to clean up the Milwaukee diocese after the ravages of Weakland?  Maybe Rome is hoping that he will do a satisfactory job in New York.

  • Nathanpearson

    I belong to a parish in the Birmingham Archdiocese. I was sad to see him go and so were many others. He did some great things in Birmingham.

  • Nathanpearson

    Not obvious at all. Some archbishops of Westminster were elevated to cardinal almost immediately, some had to wait as long as ten years. All were eventually. Vincent won’t have to wait too much longer im sure. Nobody expected him to be given the red hat before Cormac turned 80 anyway, so this is hardly a surprise. He is a wise pastor and a strong leader, his time will come.

  • GFFM

    No he did not. And he was completely inaccessible to the people who would have supported him. He dealt very badly with the renegade priests in his diocese and ignored the faithful on some very basic sacramental matters such as when first confession and confirmation should be allowed. After Weakland’s tyranny, Dolan’s tenure changed very little for the regular loyal faithful in the pew. 

  • Anonymous

    Oh dear.  Sounds like the Vatican has laid another egg with the elevation of Dolan, then.  He reminds me of Schönbrunn of Vienna with his mishandling of renegade priests.
    I agree that Charles Chaput should have got the NY job.  By all accounts he did a splendid job in Denver.

  • Anonymous

    “He did some great things in Birmingham.”

    Such as?  Allowing “gay” Masses?
    Sorry, Mr P, I do not share your admiration for our Vin.

  • Nathanpearson

    The brilliant “Walk with Me” program, which I believe other dioceses use now as well. His long-standing advocacy for the canonisation of cardinal Newman. Standing up for religion against so called “artistic freedom” when the Birmingham Rep showed a play that was extremely offensive to Birmingham’s large Sikh community. Defending the Church against hostility from the biased BBC and playing a major part in stopping them screening “Popetown”. Defending our Catholic schools from the former government’s plans to introduce quotas for non-Catholic pupils (which were then dropped). Just a few of the things that come immediately to mind.

    I understand that you disapprove of the Soho masses. All I will say on that subject is to quote the Archbishop himself: “Anybody who is trying to cast a judgement on the people who come forward for communion really ought to learn to hold their tongue”.

  • Anonymous

    “I understand that you disapprove of the Soho masses. All I will say on
    that subject is to quote the Archbishop himself: “Anybody who is trying
    to cast a judgement on the people who come forward for communion really
    ought to learn to hold their tongue”.”

    In other words, keep your mouth shut and stop complaining about the public approval of mortal sin.
    Nichols has got to go.

  • Nathanpearson

    If you’re going to make false accusations that these masses constitute “the public approval of mortal sin”, then yes, keep your mouth shut. If you believe that these masses our somehow out of step with Church teaching, I would remind you that they have Vatican approval, and if you think that Vincent Nichol’s personal views are out of line then I would remind you of his response to Tony Blair’s suggestion that the Church should change it’s views on homosexuality: “I will take my guide from Pope Benedict actually”.
    Nichols is the kind of strong leader we need in this country right now. He’s not going anywhere. Thank God.

  • Anonymous

    False accusations!?
    Correct me if I’m wrong, but the attendees at these ‘gay’ Masses are permitted to receive communion, even if they are shacked up with partners and are living in a sexual relationship.
    It’s no secret that some gays who are so attached attend these Masses to make a point, namely that they DEMAND that the Church shall abandon her opposition to the practice of homosex and recognise so-called ‘gay’ marriage.
    If this offering of ‘gay’ Masses is some form of experiment by the Church, then it is an experiment that has gone badly wrong, and the Church should cancel it forthwith.
    I think the admission by Archbishop Nichols, that the Birmingham adoption agency was encouraged by him to allow the adoption of a Catholic child by a single homosexual, is the most damning point against him.  In no circumstances should a child be adopted by a single person, whether heterosexual or homosexual.  Only a stable family relationship, one father and one mother, is adequate for this task of rearing a child – and it always has been.  For Nichols to decide otherwise is flying in the face of nature.
    I have no confidence in him.  He has got to go.

  • Nathanpearson

    Yes, the accusation that the masses are a “public approval of mortal sin” is plainly false. People who attend these masses are not asked if they are sexually active, just as they wouldn’t be asked at any other mass, so the idea that they are giving people in same sex sexual relationships some kind of special permission to receive communion is bizarre. 
    If his approval of the idea that a child is better off with a single loving parent than no family at all is the “most damning point against him” I would say he’s doing a very good job. 
    You may have no confidence in him, but it seems that the Holy Father does. That’s good enough for me.

  • Anonymous

     “People who attend these masses are not asked if they are sexually active,” 

    Since the whole point of holding these Masses is to make them available to a very limited section of the laity, a section who are notorious for their sexual proclivities, a statement should be read out from the Archbishop at the start of each of these Masses that communion is restricted to Catholics who are in a state of grace and faithful to the Church’s teaching on sexual morality, particularly as it applies to the CCC (#2357-2359).
    The Holy Father may well have confidence in Archbishop Nichols, but then not for the first time has the Holy See overstepped the limits of papal infallibility and made a miscalculation.

  • Inquisator

    Shut the f***k up. You really are an ass. I wouldn’t  be surprised if you were not a closet gay yourself – you certainly appear to have all the subtle self-loathing traits. Grow up and go and get a heart that seeks to see the good in others and at the same time take the massive tree trunk out of your eye before you continue spouting such crap about others

  • Anonymous

    Ah yes, there’s that sexual expletive once again!  So typical of the homosexual fraternity when they want to close down the debate.
    I can well understand your irritation, sir.
    You have backed a loser and you don’t like admitting it.