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England and Wales to see sharp rise in ordinations

By and on Thursday, 21 June 2012

Men ordained to the diaconate in Westminster Cathedral (Photo: Mazur)

Men ordained to the diaconate in Westminster Cathedral (Photo: Mazur)

The number of priestly ordinations across England and Wales is expected to almost double by 2013, while the number of seminarians in the Archdiocese of Southwark alone has more than doubled since 2005.

Figures show that the number of ordinations in England and Wales is expected to reach 38 in 2013, compared with 20 in 2011, while the Archdiocese of Southwark currently has 26 seminarians in contrast with only 10 in 2005.

The Southwark Vocations website states that a “campaign of prayer for vocations has coincided with a dramatic increase in the number of men coming forward as potential candidates for the priesthood”.

Fr Stephen Langridge, vocations director for the archdiocese, said that since being appointed part-time in 2005 his team had introduced a range of initiatives to encourage vocations throughout the archdiocese.

Fr Langridge said: “We have produced prayer cards for the rosary, of which 40,000 have gone out”, as well as “encouraging all parishes to hold Holy Hours of prayer for vocations”.

He explained that parishes across the archdiocese offer at least one Holy Hour a year, while others, such as Our Lady of the Annunciation church in Addiscombe, south London, hold prayer hours for vocations on a weekly or even daily basis.

Fr Langridge also cited the Quo Vadis discernment group as another significant initiative, and a summer pilgrimage offering support for young people as they discern God’s will in their lives.

Fr Langridge said the diocese had “moved from a model of recruitment to discernment”, emphasising that all young Catholics have a vocation and must be “encouraged to become better disciples of Christ”.

Archbishop Peter Smith of Southwark appointed Fr Langridge as full-time director of vocations for the archdiocese earlier this month. It is the first time in 30 years that this has been a full-time post.

The appointment follows the launch of the National Vocations Framework, which has been adopted by the Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales to “promote a culture of vocation”.

Fr Langridge will take up the full-time post in September.

The Archdiocese of Southwark covers all boroughs in south London, the whole county of Kent and the Medway Unitary Authority.

  • http://faith-and-fatherland.blogspot.co.uk/ Edmund

    Good for Fr. Langridge, I say! But is it just a coincidence that so many of these oridinands must have entered the seminary at round about the same time as the current Holy Father was elected?

  • Jeannine

    While the world sinks lower & lower in debauchery, despair, & violence, the Catholic Church seems to be renewing itself at the least likely places. Increase in priestly ordinations is usually the 1st sign of this renewal. God bless England & Wales.

  • Cestius

    This really is the most wonderful news.  Some of our priests are very overworked and need more help.  And it is a resounding answer to those that say that Catholicism is dying, the supply of priests is drying up and that we should accept women priests etc. etc.

  • Patrick_Hadley

     Yes.

  • teigitur

    No!

  • Fr. Thomas Poovathinkal

    QUOTES FOLLOW: Fr Langridge said the diocese had “moved from a model of recruitment to
    discernment”, emphasising that all young Catholics have a vocation and
    must be “encouraged to become better disciples of Christ”.

    “… that all young Catholics have a vocation ….”

    WHY ONLY YOUNG CATHOLICS? IS FATHER LEAD ONLY BY THE INSTITUTIONAL EXIGENCY?

    IS FATHER LEAD BY HIS NOSE BY THE FORCE OF A LONG ESTABLISHED CUSTOM (TRADITION) OF THE INSTITUTION?

    IF WE LOOK AT THE EXAMPLE OF JESUS THE LORD, DID HE CALL ONLY THE YOUNG PEOPLE? LOOK AT THE 12 HE CALLED. CAN ANYONE IMAGINE THEY WERE ALL YOUNG PEOPLE IN THE LIGHT OF THE NEW TESTAMENT?

    MOST OF THEM  COULD  VERY WELL BE MARRIED, MATURED IN THEIR MARRIAGE AND HAPPILY RETIRED FROM THEIR MARRIAGE (LK.18:28-29, 14:25-26) FROM THE MOMENT JESUS CALLED THEM. THEY FOLLOWED THE LORD LEAVING EVERYTHING THEY HAD.

    AS TIME PASSED THEY BECAME MORE AND MORE DELIBERATE AND HAPPILY ESTABLISHED IN THIS CHOICE OF THEIRS TO FOLLOW JESUS THE LORD, EXCEPT MAY BE FEW WHO FELL BACK ON THEIR OLD GIRLS BY WAY OF TEMPORARY RELAPSE.

    THOSE PLEADING FOR MARRIAGE AND DREAMING OF THE SAME, THOSE WHO HAVE NOT COUNTED THE COST AND YET “FOLLOWED” JESUS THE LORD WHAT IS THE SCOPE FOR THEM!

    WHEN THE LORD CALLED THE TWELVE THEY WERE LIKE RIPE FRUITS, READY TO DROP INTO THE LAP OF THE LORD AT THE VERY TOUCH OF HIS DIVINE FINGERTIPS.

    SO WHY NOT FOLLOW THE WAY AND THE METHOD, THE WHY AND THE HOW OF THE LORD IN INVITING PEOPLE FOR MINISTERING TO HIM IN HIS CHURCH? WE SHALL HAVE BETTER AND MORE FAITHFUL PEOPLE IN THEIR CHASTITY AND SERVICE OF THE WORD (LK.4:42-43) AND ALL THE REST OF IT ALL.

    LET US GO TO THE SOURCE AND STICK TO IT, HEAVEN ON EARTH, GOD THE SON HIMSELF SO THAT THE WORLD GETS EVANGELIZED.

    ONLY APOSTLES CAN EVANGELIZE. AND MERE PRIESTS! WHAT CAN THEY DO? WHAT DO THEY DO ACTUALLY?

    LOOK AT ST.PAUL. HE IS THE TYPICAL ONE TO GLORIFY THE LORD BY HIS MINISTRY.

    MERE PRIESTS CAN ONLY PERFORM RITUALS OR PERHAPS RITUALS OF THE DEAD: LIKE  THOSE TO WHOM THE LORD HINTED WHEN HE SAID TO THE YOUNG MAN HE CALLED, “LET THE DEAD BURY THEIR OWN DEAD”, “AS FOR YOU, GO AND PROCLAIM THE KINGDOM OF GOD”.

  • Kennyinliverpool

    38 isn’t that many people considering how many Catholic parishes there are in this country?
    – But yes, it’s not as terrible as 20. So I suppose that’s a step in the right direction.

  • No more NO!

    Fr.  Poovathinkal? – Are you the self same Priest who appears Collar-less on the Internet?  

    Stop criticising the good Father discussed above – and instead bear witness to your own Holy Consecration by WEARING YOUR COLLAR!!  You are not a member of the Laity Father – you have a Priestly Ministry – bear witness to it in a radical way and with obedient humility to the Traditions of the Priestly Vocation.  I am fed-up of hearing Priests say they are frightened to wear their collars in public in case someone calls them names or some such other lily-livered, modernist nonsense.  Christ said “Blessed is he who is not ashamed of Me”  and “He who denies Me before Man – I will deny before MY Father in Heaven”  Well, stop denying that you are a Priest – Father – you have a Sacred Ministry – A Chosen One, – so wear your Priestly Collar with Pride.  Those who spend their lives (and risk them!!!) bearing unashamed witness to their sacred Ministry publicly,  joyfully, etc… bear a loud and dynamic visible witness that will encourage OTHERS to enter the Clerical State also.  Merely disguising yourself as a lay person -hoping to dwindle into obscurity when out in public  - is not respectful of your Priestly Ministry, neither is it being obediant to the Churches Traditions.

    Read this Father – and may God enlighten you and encourage you to garb yourself in your correct Priestly attire.    “#1 The Roman collar is a sign of priestly consecration to the Lord. As a wedding ring distinguishes husband and wife and symbolizes the union they enjoy, so the Roman collar identifies bishops and priests (and often deacons and seminarians) and manifests their proximity to the Divine Master by virtue of their free consent to the ordained ministry to which they have been (or may be) called.#2 By wearing clerical clothing and not possessing excess clothes, the priest demonstrates adherence to the Lord’s example of material poverty. The priest does not choose his clothes – the Church has, thanks to her accumulated wisdom over the past two millennia. Humble acceptance of the Church’s desire that the priest wear the Roman collar illustrates a healthy submission to authority and conformity to the will of Christ as expressed through his Church.#3 Church Law requires clerics to wear clerical clothing. We have cited above number 66 of the Directory for priests, which itself quotes canon 284.#4 The wearing of the Roman collar is the repeated, ardent desire of Pope John Paul 11. The Holy Father’s wish in this regard cannot be summarily dismissed; he speaks with a special charism. He frequently reminds priests of the value of wearing the Roman collar.In a September 8, 1982 letter to Ugo Cardinal Poletti, his Vicar for the Diocese of Rome, instructing him to promulgate norms concerning the use of the Roman collar and religious habit, the Pontiff observed that clerical dress is valuable “not only because it contributes to the propriety of the priest in his external behavior or in the exercise of his ministry, but above all because it gives evidence within the ecclesiastical community of the public witness that each priest is held to give of his own identity and special belonging to God.”In a homily on November 8, 1982 the Pope addressed a group of transitional deacons whom he was about to ordain to the priesthood. He said that if they tried to be just like everyone else in their “style of life” and “manner of dress,” then their mission as priests of Jesus Christ would not be fully realized.#5 The Roman collar prevents “mixed messages”; other people will recognize the priest’s intentions when he finds himself in what might appear to be compromising circumstances. Let’s suppose that a priest is required to make pastoral visits to different apartment houses in an area where drug dealing or prostitution is prevalent. The Roman collar sends a clear message to everyone that the priest has come to minister to the sick and needy in Christ’s name. Idle speculation might be triggered by a priest known to neighborhood residents visiting various apartment houses dressed as a layman.#6 The Roman collar inspires others to avoid immodesty in dress, words and actions and reminds them of the need for public decorum. A cheerful but diligent and serious priest can compel others to take stock of the manner in which they conduct themselves. The Roman collar serves as a necessary challenge to an age drowning in impurity, exhibited by suggestive dress, blasphemous speech and scandalous actions.#7 The Roman collar is a protection for one’s vocation when dealing with young, attractive women. A priest out of his collar (and, naturally, not wearing a wedding ring) can appear to be an attractive target for the affections of an unmarried woman looking for a husband, or for a married woman tempted to infidelity.#8 The Roman collar offers a kind of “safeguard “for oneself. The Roman collar provides a reminder to the priest himself of his mission and identity: to witness to Jesus Christ, the Great High Priest, as one of his brother-priests.#9 A priest in a Roman collar is an inspiration to others who think: “Here is a modern disciple of Jesus.” The Roman collar speaks of the possibility of making a sincere, lasting commitment to God. Believers of diverse ages, nationalities and temperaments will note the virtuous, other-centered life of the man who gladly and proudly wears the garb of a Catholic priest, and perhaps will realize that they too can consecrate themselves anew, or for the first time, to the loving Good Shepherd.#10 The Roman collar is a source of beneficial intrigue to non-Catholics. Most non- Catholics do not have experience with ministers who wear clerical garb. Therefore, Catholic priests by virtue of their dress can cause them to reflect – even if only a cursory fashion – on the Church and what she entails.

    Read more: http://blog.beliefnet.com/deaconsbench/2010/07/why-a-priest-should-wear-the-collar.html#ixzz1yRo8HJqY 

  • on the shore

    the roman collar originated in the late 1800 s . some say by anglo- catholics.

    most secular priests and bishops in the us wore a dark suit and what has developed into tie today.
    no need to get overwrought over a piece of apparel that is not even a sacramental as the habits of some religious communities are.

    prudence dictates when the wearing of the collar makes sense. here I use prudence in the classical sense . when the wearing of the collar assist in one’s mini try wear it , when it would not , don’t.

  • gabriel_syme

    This is great news, hot on the heels of the news that female vocations have also undergone a recent sharp increase.

    I would very much like to see similar articles about vocations / general data in Scotland; I believe (perhaps wrongly) that priestly ordinations here are trundling along at maybe 5 or 6 men per year.

    However, the byzantine and impenetrable bureaucracy of the Catholic Bishops of Scotland may hinder such reporting.

    Apparently they do things very differently in Scotland, than in E&W.

    E&W Bishops can always provide clear figures for a specific topic – eg number of seminarians, sisters, entries to the Church at Easter etc.

    In Scotland, things are more muddled, with (eg) Catecumens joining the Church at Easter being lumped in under “baptisms” etc (as I understand it anyway).

    Anyway, great news for the English and Welsh, hopefully Scotland will experience a similar up turn.

    If anyone enjoys a bit of sport, post links to stories like these during discussions about faith on the Guardian website. They don’t like it up them.

  • James

    Dear oh dear!

  • David

    In percentage terms it is terrific – and clearly a welcome sign.  
    My regret is that I live in the ‘Dead See’ (Salford) which seems to be experiencing a long, slow strangulation by men stuck in the 1970s.  The exception here, of course, is the Holy Name in Manchester but it is not easy for most of us to access.

  • Christopher Kay

    If you think Salford’s bad, try coming west to Wrexham… (with all due respect to the Bishop who is a kind and Christian man).

  • Parasum

    It sounds good, such as it is. Euphoria is not helpful (not that it’s likely on this site).

    But there does seem to be a  wretched amount of bureaucracy to contend with. The CC in the UK  needs a Maggie Thatcher to undo all the Blairification, & to kick the Socialism into touch.  

  • Parasum

    Renewal ? Well, things could be worse – but they could also be far more healthy. The patient is in a critical condition still; not full of beans and bursting with health. A blip is that, a blip – and this may be no more than that. 

  • nytor

    The Holy Name is being killed off by the failure to actually elevate it into an oratory, so that it can’t ordain anyone who joins.

    The Dead See is the nickname for Cardiff too!

  • nytor

    No, it isn’t. There is a clear correlation. The pope, you see, appeals to younger people, not the ageing liberals of your ilk…

  • Patrick_Hadley

     Have you considered that the economic crisis since 2008 and high rates of unemployment among young people might be a significant factor? I suspect that if you look around the world and examine historical trends you will find that vocations tend to be higher when opportunities for intelligent young people are somewhat limited.

    The Spirit moves in mysterious ways.

  • srdc

    But, these young people have to work to support themselves in religious life too. Duh!

  • srdc

    They are a lot happier too and so much at peace. Nobody likes grumpy people.

  • JohnR

    I’m from Manchester too, and just rediscovering my faith. I’ve got a yearning for the Church and what it can offer, but here in my parish the life Catholic is moribund.

    I wasn’t aware that Salford had a reputation for this. Perhaps it’s up to young(er) people like myself to try and inject some dynamism into things.

    Though at the moment I haven’t a clue how…..

  • winefride

    So, is your Bishop Mark Davies ? if so,  I think you are more blessed than you realise.

  • theroadmaster

    The seeds of discernment are starting to grow into healthy vines amongst the weeds of indifference and cynicism.   Let us hope that a fruitful harvest is brought in as more men and women step forward to live out their vocational calling in the global vineyard of the Lord.

  • Parasum

    “This is great news, hot on the heels of the news that female vocations have also undergone a recent sharp increase.”

    ## I wonder if the 8.3…. % increase in the number of the Apostles after the election of St.Matthias would count as a “sharp increase” ?

    If the stats for conversions and receptions in Scotland were anything to celebrate, maybe the Scottish bishops would not camouflage them by adding them to stats for baptisms.  If people hide something, they cannot complain when people suspect they are hiding bad news. I find the idea that these stats are a “sharp increase” either pitiful, or pathetic, or laughable. Eyes, wool, over, pulling of the, seems to be what’s happening.

  • Sea of Estrogen

     Actually, this is indicative of a worldwide trend (though not as striking in degree).  The last 10 years have seen an increase in the number of priests every year during that time (with the trend expected to continue).

  • Sea of Estrogen

     This worldwide increase is in spite of double-digit % decreases in Europe.

  • Sea of Estrogen

     The worldwide annual increases in the number of priests started in 2000.  Any other theories?

  • Andrew

    John, i myself live in Salford, and although not as young as i used to be, and not so much as a Mass attendee as i would hope, i dearly do love to hear such news… i only hope married men like myself(with children) could put ourselves forward for the priesthood… i think the church would be surprised with what we could offer.

  • JohnR

    Indeed. If I thought myself worthy of standing ‘in persona Christi’ I might also seriously consider an ordained life, but, at the moment, I wouldn’t wish to foist upon the authorities the embarrassment of having to tell me I’m not the man for the job. Like they say, many are called, few are chosen…..

  • Patrick_Hadley

     And Cardinal Ratzinger did not become Pope until 2005, so that does not really help with establishing a causal link. 

  • Joannie

    Despite the negative media (secular) coverage of the Faith as either dying or dead in Europe is false as this article shows. The reasons for this dramatic increase may very but I think the Pope’s 2010 visit to the Country may have something to do with it as the year 2005, when one Pope died and another was elected. It is similar here in the United States as far as Ordinations. Not as many as before Vatican II but at least it is a promising start for the renewal of the Faith not only in England and Wales but also in Australia and New Zealand. This is the beginnings of the “new springtime” Blessed John Paul had hoped for several years ago. John Paul sowed the seeds and now Benedict is reaping the harvest.

  • Fr. Thomas Poovathinkal

     
    IF YOU WANT TO BE GOOD (REMEMBER WHO SAID, “ONLY GOD IS GOOD”?) DON’T LOOK AT OTHERS, OR SAY THE MORIBUNDS. THE WORLD IS FULL OF THEM.

    WHY NOT FIX YOUR GAZE ONLY ON THE ONE WHO CALLS TO FOLLOW HIM?

    “CLUE” COMES WHEN ONE SITS AT THE FEET OF THE LORD LIKE MARY SISTER OF LAZARUS.

  • Fr. Thomas Poovathinkal

     
    YOU MEAN LIKE SOME OF THE APOSTLES!

  • Fr. Thomas Poovathinkal

     
    IN INDIA HARDLY ANYBODY IS FOUND WEARING A ROMAN COLLAR AND ESPECIALLY SO IN KERALA, EXCEPT HERE AND THERE FEW FOREIGN RETURNED.

    IN MY COUNTRY THERE ARE SOME (VINCENTIAN FATHERS AND OTHERS WHO GOT INSPIRED BY THEM) WHO PROCLAIM GOD’S WORD IN THE SPIRIT OF THE APOSTLES. I WISH ALL THE PRIESTS HERE COULD WEAR “GARUA” COLOURED DRESS BETTER SUITING TO OUR CULTURE BY WAY OF WITNESS AS IN THE CASE OF DE NOBILI AND SOME OTHERS.

    AS FOR MYSELF I AM HARDLY IN THE MINISTRY IN THE ORDINARY SENSE BUT I DO CREATE OPPORTUNITIES FOR MYSELF TO BEAR WITNESS TO JESUS AND PROCLAIM HIS WORD EFFECTIVELY ESPECIALLY AMONG HINDUS AND OTHERS.

  • gabriel_syme

    Hi Parasum,

    You cannot credibly write off an almost 100% increase in just two years as “pitiful, or pathetic, or laughable”.

    Yes the numbers are quite small – a few dozen – but you cannot deny this is indeed a “sharp increase”.

    And I was not suggesting the Scottish Bishops are trying to hide anything via the way they do things, rather I was saying I like the way the English statistics are clearer. 

    You tend to find the Scottish Bishops frequently do battle with the media / Scottish Parliament etc, and so I suspect statistics are among the least of their priorities.

    In any case, it is entirely valid to count new members under baptisms – it just a different way of doing things, but less clear for the casual observer.

    This Easter, in my Glasgow Parish, 2 young women in their 20s were received as full members of the Catholic Church. 

    If every Catholic Parish in Scotland could say the same, that would be about 1000 young adult converts.

    But that’s pure conjecture as I dont know details about the other parishes, hence my original post.  I only know about the 2 young women in my own parish because I was actually present during their reception.

  • gabriel_syme

     Hi John

    I returned to Catholicism aged 28, after years of thinking about it.  I don’t regret it for a minute (now 34).  I understand what you say about finding parish life moribund, but you are right that you can make a difference.

    Get involved, make suggestions, offer your services.  All of this, even from one individual, builds momentum.  There are a million ways people – especially the young – can stimulate their parishes: take on a ministry (reader etc), contribute to parish charitable groups (marys meals, spuc, AoS etc), get involved in outreach efforts.

    If these things dont exist in your parish – you be the one to start them. 
    Personally be the change you want to see.  Visitors to your parish, especially young people, will be more inclined to give it a chance and feel involved, if they see other young people attending, giving time, helping out, in leadership roles etc.

    I understand it is bewildering, you feel a bit lost, powerless to help or do anything – as individuals we feel insignificant.  But once you take that first step you will experience a real empowerment and reward, and your example will encourage others, even if you do not know it at first.

    Parish life only becomes moribund when everyone is sitting back waiting for someone else to say or do something.

    But when we – as individual, insignificant drops of water – add ourselves to a tiny stream, so it grows to become a mighty torrent.

    Good luck and God speed!

    PS – do not underestimate the vitality which traditional Catholicism brings.  Bear it in mind.  Making accommodations with secular society and backsliding are not the way to grow Churches, as the fate of British protestantism shows.

  • gabriel_syme

     i only hope married men like myself(with children) could put ourselves
    forward for the priesthood… i think the church would be surprised with
    what we could offer.
    ——

    Hi Andrew,

    The Church knows you have a lot to offer.  That’s why married men can become permanent Deacons.

    Why not consider the permanent Diaconate?

    Do not see it as a semi-priest, or 2nd class – a Deacon is minister of the Church with an important role to play.

    A married friend of mine – formerly a protestant minister – was recently ordained as a Catholic Deacon and he loves it.

    Its true that everyone has a vocation, but its not to be a priest for everyone.  The life of a priest is one of total devotion.  A man cannot do both God and a family justice in tandem.

    Marriage itself is a vocation, one which does not preclude a further vocation to serve a Deacon.

    Go for it – fulfill your promise and unselfishly give that what you have to offer – do not let personal frustration with the Church structures cause you to jealously hold your gifts back.

    All the best!

  • Regina

    A blip?!  Prayers are being answered. Thanks be to God.

  • David

    Obviously I don’t know where you are, or which parish you attend, but my experience of ‘Catholic life’ in Salford is that it is an absolute disaster, unless you enjoy stark, 1970s-style religion with lots of polyester & mindless choruses.

    As I said in my earlier post, the Holy Name is a fine beacon but we really need others outside the city centre. The sad thing is that I suspect any attempt to revitalise the Diocese would be met with stern opposition.  So many of the people I know are yearning for a revival, but the Diocese seems to be resigned to a managed decline leading to extinction.Prayer, of course, is powerful & we should pray for good priests and a re-energising of our parishes & ourselves.
    God bless you and your journey.

  • Parasum

    “Yes the numbers are quite small – a few dozen – but you cannot deny this is indeed a “sharp increase”.”

    ## There is a US diocese in which one (1) priest has been ordained – he is the sole member of his year. If two seminarians are ordained in that diocese, that will be a 50% rise in ordinations. Which would sound hugely impressive – *unless* one were to see how many priests that actually meant.38 ordinations compared to 20 is an increase over 20 of 90 % – again, enormously impressive: until one looks at how many priests that adds up to. The answer is: precious few. Something is not as it should be,  when Catholics treat a tiny actual increase of 18 priests over 20 as though it were a New Pentecost – compared to the need, it is woeful. It is a symptom of the decline in the number of priests – most are ageing or elderly, & overworked. What is 18 more priests compared to that ?

    And the area covered is England & Wales. There are about 4.5 million Catholics in England & Wales – and the result is 38 priests. That is not impressive, or not in a good sense.

    “In any case, it is entirely valid to count new members under baptisms – it just a different way of doing things, but less clear for the casual observer.”

    ## It does have the advantage of giving the impression that there are more converts than is the case. But, it is deceitful or ignorant to confuse two entirely different groups of people. A healthy Church will gain converts, in accord with the Great Commission laid on the Apostles by Christ. A moribund and or sickly Church will be quiet happy to gain members not through conversions, but through procreation by its members; just as though the Great Commission were of no importance. A sickly church will be content to gain members through immigration – but a Church that increases in members in that way could easily not see a single convert from one year’s end to the next. That the figures are up, need not mean an increase  through conversions – & could well conceal a drop in numbers at home, if the number of immigrants were large enough. At least the bishops of E & W do (or did) distinguish the two groups. 

    So the combining of the two sets of stats is not valid at all.

    If 5,000 children are baptised in one year, 3,000 die or leave in the same year, & 500 immigrate in that same period, there is a net loss of 2,500 people. If, the next year,  there are 6,000 baptisms, 2,000 immigrants, and 5,000 dead or leaving the CC or going abroad, there are 8,000 new members for the CC in that area – but 5,000 leaving, which makes a net gain of 3,000.

    “This Easter, in my Glasgow Parish, 2 young women in their 20s were received as full members of the Catholic Church. 
    If every Catholic Parish in Scotland could say the same, that would be about 1000 young adult converts.” 

    ## At the first Pentecost, there were 3,000 converts baptised. After one sermon by St.Peter. And two is supposed to be impressive ? It will matter for them, no doubt, but it is nothing compared to the vast numbers who are *not* converted. The CC seems to think evangelisation is even less important than good preaching – unlike the really essential things: looking after the environment, jetting off to Rome for Papal events, bandying words with politicians: the theologically central stuff that the Church was founded to carry out.

    Or is that too cynical ?  

  • Parasum

    But it’s an increase following decades of a colossal slump. Which puts matters in a rather diff. perspective. 

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