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New bishop asks the faithful to fight ‘strangling counter-culture of death’

By on Wednesday, 26 September 2012

Bishop Egan waves to his fellow bishops after the ordination Mass (Photo: CNS)

Bishop Egan waves to his fellow bishops after the ordination Mass (Photo: CNS)

The new Bishop of Portsmouth has urged Catholics to fight the “strangling counter-culture of death” in England.

During his inaugural address on Monday at the Cathedral Church of St John the Evangelist, Bishop Philip Egan said that Catholics must communicate the message of Good News to the people of England.

He said: “We must offer this salvific message to a people sorely in need of new hope and direction, disenfranchised by the desert of modern British politics, wearied by the cycle of work, shopping, entertainment, and betrayed by educational, legal, medical and social policy makers who, in the relativistic world they’re creating, however well-intentioned, are sowing the seeds of a strangling counter-culture of death.”

He also reminded Catholics of the constant human need for “immortality and for the Divine”. He said: “Human needs ever remain essentially the same: the need to love and to be loved, the need for a purpose and vocation in life, the need to belong to family and community, the need for mercy and forgiveness, for peace and justice, for freedom and happiness, and most profoundly, the need for immortality and for the divine.”

Our full report and editorial comment are available in this week’s paper.

FULL TEXT OF BISHOP EGAN’S HOMILY

Dear fellow pilgrims on life’s journey, we inhabit a remarkable century, the 21st, which despite the current economic distemper, is witnessing momentous advances in every domain of human knowledge and endeavour, with new discoveries and new applications in science and engineering, in computing and cybernetics, in medicine and biotechnology, in the social sciences, arts and humanities, all of which manifest the limitless self-transcending reach of human experience, understanding and judgment and the cloud of burgeoning possibilities for human deciding, undreamt of by those who’ve gone before.

Indeed, even as we speak, Curiosity is roving among the sand dunes of Mars, in anticipation of a manned space voyage to the red planet. With all these exhilarating developments, the Catholic Tradition must engage, the old with the new, in a mutually enriching critical conversation.

Yet the ordination of a bishop, as Successor of the Apostles, in communion of mind, will and heart with the Pope, as the chief shepherd, teacher and high priest of the diocese entrusted to him, who, like the Master, must lay down his life for his flock, reminds us that human needs ever remain essentially the same: the need to love and to be loved, the need for a purpose and vocation in life, the need to belong to family and community, the need for mercy and forgiveness, for peace and justice, for freedom and happiness, and most profoundly, the need for immortality and for the Divine.

All these fundamental desires, hard-wired into the human heart, theology expresses in the word ‘salvation’, and we profess that every child, woman and man on this planet can find that salvation. There is a Way – and it’s the Truth! It’s the true Way that leads to Life, real life, life to the full, a life that never ends. There is a Way, and it’s not a strategy, a philosophy or a package deal. This Way has a Name, because it’s a Person, the only Person in human history who really did rise from the dead, a Person alive here and now: Jesus of Nazareth, God the Son Incarnate. He alone can save us.

He alone can give us the salvation our spirits crave. He alone can reveal to us the Truth about God and about life, about happiness and humanism, about sexuality and family values, about how to bring to the world order, justice, reconciliation and peace.

This message of Good News, and the civilisation of love it occasions, we Catholics must now communicate imaginatively, with confidence and clarity, together with our fellow Christians, and all people of faith and good will, to the people of England, this wonderful land, Mary’s Dowry. We must offer this salvific message to a people, sorely in need of new hope and direction, disenfranchised by the desert of modern British politics, wearied by the cycle of work, shopping, entertainment, and betrayed by educational, legal, medical and social policymakers who, in the relativistic world they’re creating, however well-intentioned, are sowing the seeds of a strangling counterculture of death.

My brothers and sisters, today, the feast of Our Lady of Ransom, of England’s Nazareth, let’s go forth from this Mass with joyful vigour, resolved in the Holy Spirit, to help bring about the conversions needed – intellectual, moral and spiritual – for everyone we meet to receive Jesus Christ, the Gospel of Life… Please pray for me to the Lord Jesus, whose Heart yearns for us in the Blessed Sacrament, that I might be a humble and holy, orthodox, creative and courageous Bishop of Portsmouth, one fashioned after the Lord’s own.

  • Teresa

    Simply beautiful

    Needed to be said – particularly the comment pertaining to how secular culture has let us down
    ; making us ever more empty and unhappy
    That with The Way, we could find the peace we all need

  • Euthebass

    Thanks Benedict – what a wonderful gift from Mary.

  • Euthebass

    Bishop Egan’s is a fine homily by a deeply pastoral priest with a heart close to Christ’s – speaking with passion about the Faith.

  • Euthebass

    A fine homily by a bishop who is first of all a deeply pastoral priest with a heart close to Christ.

  • Darryl Jordan

    Thanks be to God.