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New bishop asks the faithful to fight ‘strangling counter-culture of death’

By on Wednesday, 26 September 2012

Bishop Egan waves to his fellow bishops after the ordination Mass (Photo: CNS)

Bishop Egan waves to his fellow bishops after the ordination Mass (Photo: CNS)

The new Bishop of Portsmouth has urged Catholics to fight the “strangling counter-culture of death” in England.

During his inaugural address on Monday at the Cathedral Church of St John the Evangelist, Bishop Philip Egan said that Catholics must communicate the message of Good News to the people of England.

He said: “We must offer this salvific message to a people sorely in need of new hope and direction, disenfranchised by the desert of modern British politics, wearied by the cycle of work, shopping, entertainment, and betrayed by educational, legal, medical and social policy makers who, in the relativistic world they’re creating, however well-intentioned, are sowing the seeds of a strangling counter-culture of death.”

He also reminded Catholics of the constant human need for “immortality and for the Divine”. He said: “Human needs ever remain essentially the same: the need to love and to be loved, the need for a purpose and vocation in life, the need to belong to family and community, the need for mercy and forgiveness, for peace and justice, for freedom and happiness, and most profoundly, the need for immortality and for the divine.”

Our full report and editorial comment are available in this week’s paper.

FULL TEXT OF BISHOP EGAN’S HOMILY

Dear fellow pilgrims on life’s journey, we inhabit a remarkable century, the 21st, which despite the current economic distemper, is witnessing momentous advances in every domain of human knowledge and endeavour, with new discoveries and new applications in science and engineering, in computing and cybernetics, in medicine and biotechnology, in the social sciences, arts and humanities, all of which manifest the limitless self-transcending reach of human experience, understanding and judgment and the cloud of burgeoning possibilities for human deciding, undreamt of by those who’ve gone before.

Indeed, even as we speak, Curiosity is roving among the sand dunes of Mars, in anticipation of a manned space voyage to the red planet. With all these exhilarating developments, the Catholic Tradition must engage, the old with the new, in a mutually enriching critical conversation.

Yet the ordination of a bishop, as Successor of the Apostles, in communion of mind, will and heart with the Pope, as the chief shepherd, teacher and high priest of the diocese entrusted to him, who, like the Master, must lay down his life for his flock, reminds us that human needs ever remain essentially the same: the need to love and to be loved, the need for a purpose and vocation in life, the need to belong to family and community, the need for mercy and forgiveness, for peace and justice, for freedom and happiness, and most profoundly, the need for immortality and for the Divine.

All these fundamental desires, hard-wired into the human heart, theology expresses in the word ‘salvation’, and we profess that every child, woman and man on this planet can find that salvation. There is a Way – and it’s the Truth! It’s the true Way that leads to Life, real life, life to the full, a life that never ends. There is a Way, and it’s not a strategy, a philosophy or a package deal. This Way has a Name, because it’s a Person, the only Person in human history who really did rise from the dead, a Person alive here and now: Jesus of Nazareth, God the Son Incarnate. He alone can save us.

He alone can give us the salvation our spirits crave. He alone can reveal to us the Truth about God and about life, about happiness and humanism, about sexuality and family values, about how to bring to the world order, justice, reconciliation and peace.

This message of Good News, and the civilisation of love it occasions, we Catholics must now communicate imaginatively, with confidence and clarity, together with our fellow Christians, and all people of faith and good will, to the people of England, this wonderful land, Mary’s Dowry. We must offer this salvific message to a people, sorely in need of new hope and direction, disenfranchised by the desert of modern British politics, wearied by the cycle of work, shopping, entertainment, and betrayed by educational, legal, medical and social policymakers who, in the relativistic world they’re creating, however well-intentioned, are sowing the seeds of a strangling counterculture of death.

My brothers and sisters, today, the feast of Our Lady of Ransom, of England’s Nazareth, let’s go forth from this Mass with joyful vigour, resolved in the Holy Spirit, to help bring about the conversions needed – intellectual, moral and spiritual – for everyone we meet to receive Jesus Christ, the Gospel of Life… Please pray for me to the Lord Jesus, whose Heart yearns for us in the Blessed Sacrament, that I might be a humble and holy, orthodox, creative and courageous Bishop of Portsmouth, one fashioned after the Lord’s own.

  • http://twitter.com/CatholicAdam Adam C

    One word: “Awesome”.

    On a side note for liturgical enthusiasts if you look in some of the pictures he appears to be wearing the pontifical dalmatic.

  • nytor

    Shouldn’t it be the “consecration” mass? A bishop is consecrated, is he not?

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/PWZKI7JBARE4DDT3NQ22RWMOJE Benedict Carter

    “Consecration”, not ordination. He was already ordained. 

  • JabbaPapa

    Doctrinally, you are correct, and consecration is more appropriate ; sacramentally though, his Sacrament, his Ordo, has being re-ordinated from priest to Bishop, so in that sense it is possible to speak of an ordination Mass.

    It’s true that the two descriptors are not interchangeable (it would be absurd to describe a Bishop’s consecration as an “ordination” from a theological or doctrinal point of view ; just as it would be absurd to speak of his ordination as a mere consecration from a fundamentally sacramental perspective, and I mean sacramental and not the theology of the Sacraments), though when being spoken of in a more general manner, personal preference can prevail.

  • paulsays

    ‘Culture of death’ claptrap is becoming old. I realize that the Church is hardly the most… concise, shall we say, in summing up its arguments. But this is just plain silly.

    Opposition to abortion, to euthanasia and to stem cell research. Lets just try and state things as we mean things.

  • paulsays

    Oh yeah and to stop babbling on about a ‘relativistic’ culture etc etc erksome, and incorrect for the most part too.

  • Jon Brownridge

     I think you are right. Priests are ordained, Bishops are consecrated.

  • mollysdad

    Contraception is the main driver of the culture of death. Get that banned as a Class A drug, and we won’t be doing too badly.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/PWZKI7JBARE4DDT3NQ22RWMOJE Benedict Carter

    Am impressed by this short discourse of the Bishop. He didn’t just witter on with the usual nonsense. Good start!

  • Sweetjae

    Ha, well that’s a surprise coming from you, Mr. Carter, I really though you only admire Bishop Williamson!

  • hopefroreurope

    The word is irksome and I suggest your passing off Catholic truth is due to your own relativistic lifestyle and culture of death advocacy.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/PWZKI7JBARE4DDT3NQ22RWMOJE Benedict Carter

    You don’t know much.

  • Rizzo the Bear

    Another masterstroke choice by Pope Benedict XVI. Another bishop who tells it like it is, says what he means. No bull.

    More, please!

  • Rizzo the Bear

    Well said! And so true.

  • Rizzo the Bear

    You’re dead right. Bishops are indeed consecrated.

    Which politically-correct numpty decided to call it ‘ordained’, which is for priests?

  • awkwardcustomer

    All those words from Bishop Egan and no mention of the Cross.  Too scary, eh?

  • awkwardcustomer

    The refusal of the Cross is the main driver of the culture of death.

  • Basil Loftus

    In that case stop bickering with the Bishops and start praying for them. They and he will need all the prayers and fasting that you are able to offer!

  • Mjmorani

    I believe in medical science,and that it is Jesus given and Our Father willed, to bring down suffering,so I do not go along with everything that is in the Roman Catholic manual,but it is nice to read that the Bishop is living in the 21st century ,and thank you Queen Elizabeth 11 for allowing the Roman Catholic Church to preach the good news in freedom,in the great British tradition of true civilization.

  • scary goat

     Yes, I am very impressed too.  I specially liked the part about salvation.  That’s something I can really relate to.  As I understand it, and I’m no expert, there is a bit of an issue about “no salvation outside the Church” with the SSPX, isn’t there?  As a convert and having lived outside the Church, I only ever felt salvation in the Church (in this life). I sort of feel in my bones that there is no salvation outside the Church, but at the same time I worry about the question of ignorance and salvation in the eternal sense.  While probably most people on Earth have some idea of the Church, IMO profound ignorance is all around, through indoctrination etc.  I liked the Bishop’s explanation. Any bridges being built with SSPX ?

  • scary goat

     I think you have misunderstood the “culture of death” claptrap.  Abortion, Euthanasia etc. are only a part of it.  If you notice, the Bishop was talking about the fullness of life which comes about through Christian (Catholic) Faith.  Man’s natural aspirations being fulfilled.  He seems to have been talking about a counter-culture of death in relation to this, the strangling of man’s aspirations rather than their fulfillment. Abortion, Euthanasia etc. are symptoms of a much larger disease.

  • Parasum

     “He also reminded Catholics of the constant human need for “immortality and for the Divine”.”

    ## Tosh. Nowhere does the NT speak of “the Divine” – its authors are too taken up with exalting & glorifying God & His Christ, no matter what the cost. Bishops mustn’t be so afraid to preach the Gospel in its entirety; nor must any Christian.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/PWZKI7JBARE4DDT3NQ22RWMOJE Benedict Carter

    Scary, good question. Here are my thoughts. 

    The dogma (not doctrine) of “extra ecclesia nulla salus est” (Outside the Church there is no Salvation) is based of course on Scripture and as far as the Scriptural, Patristic, Papal and Conciliar teachings are concerned, the key ones can be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extra_Ecclesiam_nulla_salus

    Christ founded one Church which is the sole provider if you like of Salvation by virtue of her possession of all the truth of Revelation, of the Sacraments and of Peter the Chief Shepherd who has been given the keys to Heaven and to whom has been given the commission by Christ to “feed my sheep” and “confirm the brethren”.  

    While the Church has always allowed the possibility that some of Her members exist outside Her visible structures by virtue of an upright life coupled with invincible ignorance or by virtue of a desire for baptism, in recent times (starting with a certain Council held during the 1960′s) a terrible doctrinal confusion has come into the Catholic mind so that Catholics no longer understand this dogma or they reject what they think it means. 

    The problem is in the Council’s description of Christ’s Church as “subsisting” in the Catholic Church rather than simply saying “is” the Catholic Church. Cardinal Ratzinger’s statement in “Dominus Iesus” (1992 I think) that “subsists” actually does mean “is” doesn’t really help matters, because it’s clear that he believes the Church – the visible Church – to be something greater than the Catholic Church, but what it is, he doesn’t say. 

    This is very dangerous theological ground, which fuels the ecumenistic movement, much of which has long been frankly heretical. The Church is One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic. Only within its borders can one have the guarantee (assuming one perseveres in faith, hope and charity and Grace) of having all the means of finding Salvation. One may be baptised validly elsewhere, but none of the other means have been given to any but the Catholic Church. 

    This modern enlarging of the concept of the Church – but with no boundary to the enlarging given – has led to a very widespread indifferentism and to even a rejection of the divine nature of the Church. 

    So this dogma is not an SSPX matter, but one for the whole Church and for the whole world. 

  • Parasum

    Before V2, he was said to be consecrated, yes. The word “ordination” has replaced “consecration” to avoid any suggestion that episcopal ordination is numerically different from priestly & diaconal ordination – the intent was to emphasise that in the Sacrament of Ordination are conferred three (and only three; not seven) degrees of participation in the One Priesthood of Christ; and that all three degrees of fullness of the sacrament of Order are participations in one sacrament: episcopal ordination is not a different sacrament from the sacrament of Order, but a different degree of fullness of the sacramental grace conferred on deacons & on priests when they are ordained.  All are ordained, so all receive the same Sacrament of Order, but in different fullness for their different functions in the Church.

    The Council also wanted to emphasise that only the three NT degrees of the sacramental were truly sacramental; for they are of Divine institution – the other four, including the sub-diaconate, are of ecclesiastical institution, which makes it impossible for them to sacramental in the strict & proper sense. Which is why there are no longer ordinations to the sub-diaconate in the post-V2 Church, but only ordinations to the three NT degrees of the Sacrament of Ordination.

    The word “consecration” is not specific enough to distinguish the priesthood from the episcopate – after all, buildings and laity can also be consecrated. but they are not clerics.

    Does that clarify things ?

  • scary goat

     Thank you very much mr Carter.  Very informative. I will check the link later and give the matter some further thought. 

  • JabbaPapa

    ## Tosh. Nowhere does the NT speak of “the Divine”

    Sorry, you’re wrong — the English translations you’re used to may make no mention of it in those terms, but in both the Greek and in the Latin of the Vulgate and Vetus Latina versions, the noun god/God and the adjective godly/divine are basically one word with both noun and adjective functions — which is a common occurrence for the older words in both languages of Indo-European origin.

    Suggestions in the NT that we will “become gods”, for instance, is properly understood as we will “become divine/become divine beings”.

    In other words, the NT speaks constantly of “the Divine”, notwithstanding how that concept is translated into this or that particular language.

  • JabbaPapa

    Very informative yes, but there is the other basic interpretation, also of ancient origin, that can be pondered.

    In the earliest centuries after the doctrine was first promulgated, and this was in Antiquity, the theologians and Popes when explaining it habitually referred to it as a tautology, meaning that “no salvation outside the Church” is synonymous with “all saved belong to the Church”.

    That is to say that all of those who are saved by God’s mercy but were never a part of our Earthly Church belong to the Church anyway — which means the celestial Church in Heaven.

    It’s actually a doctrine that teaches about the nature of salvation, IMO, rather than defining its necessary preconditions — it states that all salvation is inside the Church, so that there is only one Heaven (not multiple heavens to accommodate those saved from outside of our Faith — which was an actual heresy at the time BTW), and that all of those saved by God’s Grace will be gathered together in one Church with the Christ in Heaven.

    THIS : Christ founded one Church which is the sole provider if you like of
    Salvation by virtue of her possession of all the truth of Revelation, of
    the Sacraments and of Peter the Chief Shepherd who has been given the
    keys to Heaven and to whom has been given the commission by Christ to
    “feed my sheep” and “confirm the brethren”. 

    … remains of course completely true. The Earthly Church is the only pathway in this world leading towards salvation.

    Ben : The problem is in the Council’s description of Christ’s Church as
    “subsisting” in the Catholic Church rather than simply saying “is” the
    Catholic Church. Cardinal Ratzinger’s statement in “Dominus Iesus” (1992
    I think) that “subsists” actually does mean “is” doesn’t really help,
    because it’s clear that he believes the Church – the visible Church – to
    be something greater than just the Catholic Church, but what it is, he
    doesn’t say.

    In my opinion, critics of the subsistit in phrase are not thinking things through — the statement that the Church of Christ subsists in the Catholic Church necessarily requires that it subsists in no other church nor religion nor sect nor anything else of that sort.

    “Subsistere” in its usual sense means something like “stays within”, but in its stronger form it becomes close to the related word “subsistentia”, which means “existence”.

    I think that the teaching reflects the Augustinian question : “How many sheep there are without, how many wolves within!” (Homilies on John, 45, 12), in that simply “being” a Catholic does not guarantee salvation, and belonging to Christ’s Church in the Afterlife ; whereas some of those outside the Church will be saved, and find Grace to join the Faithful in the Church in Heaven.

    Ben : This modern enlarging of the concept of the VISIBLE Church (as opposed
    to the invisible, which is known to God alone), but with no boundary to
    the enlargement given

    As you see, I’d disagree that the subsistit in phrase actually provides any such thing — but I’d certainly agree that the Modernists and relativists support exactly the heretical teachings that you describe.

  • Patrickhowes

    Bang on!Well done Benedict!This is what scares me about the direction of the Church.Yes we can know Christ through the Gospel,but one thing is knowing and reading about his life and works and the other is growing in faith with Our Lord.I completely agree with your point about Heresy.This word has become almost a swear word in Catholic circles.It is considered judgemental when it is not.It is simply an expression to explain a moving away from truth and orthodoxy.I loved Bishop Egans comment about “Orthodox”The Catholic faith is of the orthodox tradition,in other words from the East.The Protestant and Anglican faiths are European in identity.Sadly we have confused Christian humanism with humanism.The former believes that man must redeem himself and strive to imitate Christ.The latter has come to mean that Christ must be moulded in to our Human characteristics.Christ was Divine expessed in human form.The term visible Church is theologically not right.The Church is the mystical body of Christ,with a head,arms etcetera.As St Paul Says in Corinthians,the body can have many parts but  must act as one body.This is where things have gone terribly wrong.Churches have been created within Churches and people have almost done DIY Catholocism to suit their own view points and lifestyles.Yes God came to call sinners,but a humble sinner who has opened his eyes,ears and his heart to God.The Anglican Church is set to fail as it is based upon an act of human heresey.Henry the eoghth brought it upon himself to defy God and never repent.His marriage was blessed according to God´s laws and when it did not suit him,he deemed himself important enough to creat his own.Never has there been a finer example of relativism.The danger is that the Catholic Church must have its doors open to receive but not to accommodate others belief patterns.The Catholic altar faces east not west and that is the direction in which the Church must journey in its salvation of souls.

  • Patrickhowes

    Well ,I think that maybe by culture of death,They mean more than the moral issues.Christ´s death meant the offer of eternal life for us and I think he means the agessive secularization of society.A lot of people are going through schools and do not know about Jesus Christ!

  • nytor

    I should have known Vatican II would have something to do with it. I shall continue to refer to the consecration of bishops.

  • JabbaPapa

    Good post scary.

    I sort of feel in my bones that there is no salvation outside the
    Church, but at the same time I worry about the question of ignorance and
    salvation in the eternal sense.

    That is precisely why this question is described as a Mystery of the Faith in any proper theology or catechesis :-)

  • W Lewis513

    True , but some progress! We are talking of salvic and salvation, Good Heavens. I am sure he vwill hace to endure the wrath  of Kiran Conroy, who does not belive in savation and his last sttement was you cannot talk about it. So some progress by the South Coast Bishops. Inn general they believe not in salvation but the church is a social club and nor more .

  • scary goat

     Thanks Jabba.  And thanks for the post below as well.  Between you and mr BC there is a lot of information there.  I will give it all further consideration. :-)

  • Rmeburgess

    Perhaps the bishop should try living in North Korea and then he can talk about a culture of death. If he thinks the Catholic Church can be a model of moral rectitude to the world after the abuse scandal, well what a sick joke.
    I cannot help thinking that bishops of the Davies/Egan type who are jumping on the traditionalist bandwagon to be in with the present pope would jump the other way if there were another John XXIII. The coming to power of these men shows even more clearly how much we have lost with the death of Cardinal Martini, one of the few recent church leaders of real integrity and Christlike humility.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/PWZKI7JBARE4DDT3NQ22RWMOJE Benedict Carter

    Nonsense from start to finish.

    The Church is indefectible and is the perfect society.
    The paedophile scourge is nearly all concentrated in the 1970′s and 1980′s and is inextricably linked to the invasion of the priesthood by homosexuals.
    This Pope is a conservative neo-Modernist and in no sense is a Traditionalist. 

    You display a serious ignorance in every line of your post.

  • Cafeteria R.C.

    The late good holy Cardinal Martini words will not die or be blow away by the winds of change with the old fig leafs account the greater percent of the RCC membership of the western world views have changed from the past as the RCC administration knows very well and will aggiornamento the RCC with a new pope and Vatican III. Time and truth waits for no one.

  • Cafeteria R.C.

    He is now totally under the watchful eyes of the Vatican. 

  • whytheworldisending

    Yes but isn’t it simpler than some people might think reading these posts? Isn’t the Church the dwelling place of the Holy Spirit, and doesn’t the Holy Spirit, like the wind, blow where it will? And doesn’t Jesus promise the Holy Spirit to those who love him enough to keep his commandments? Just as Jesus said of the jewish authorities, who occupied the seat of Moses, they are to be obeyed, even if not copied, doesn’t the Catholic Church teach the only one true faith in accordance with the Gospels? As such, those who want to receive the Holy Spirit would do well to follow the teachings of the institutional church. The rest is up to God. When He sent the Holy Spirit on Cornelius and his household, they had not yet been baptised with water, but, as Cornelius explained in Acts 10:33 they were all assembled present before God to hear all that Peter had been commanded by the Lord. In other words, they were ready to obey Christ. Contrast with the behaviour of some baptised with water, who think they can pick and choose which commandments to obey, or adapt them to suit the times we live in. Jesus said he would build his church on the rock, just after Peter had professed the divine sonship of Jesus Christ. Nobody who really believes in Jesus as God ignores what he says. Like the man who built his house on rock, they listen and obey, and not only some, but all of His words, since like the treasure buried in the field, the reward may be lost unless the whole of God’s Word is accepted. Of course “Go and baptise all nations…” is a commandment too, but it is only one. “…and teach them to obey ALL of the commandments I have given you” is another.

  • JabbaPapa

    God lives outside time.

    Vatican III —- CRIPES !!!!

    You are delusional concerning the very nature of the Church.

  • JabbaPapa

    Cripes, are you some kind of Portsmouth diocese OAP ???

  • Patrickhowes

    I agree that Christ´s instruction “Keep ye my commandments” is important but just as the wind of the Holy spirit exists in this world so do the claws of the devil.Good and evil reside.The devil is a champion at destroying what God has constrcuted and he has an ability to sow confusion and doubt even in the minds of many who are in the Church.Remember Paul vl´s affirmation that black smoke pervades within the Church.Do not be too judgemental of those who are confused as they rely on the quality of the teachers and this is at the crux of the Church´s problem!The problem is from within.We need a new generation of good priest who teach exactly what you have written.Who clearly know what the teaching of Christ is as was inherited by Peter

  • Veritas

    And Bishop Egan offered an hour of Adoration in his chapel on the eve of his Consecration where priests and faithful of the Household could pray before the Blessed Sacrament, all attended except the Consecrating Bishop, Hollis, who was too busy, he said, watching Downton Abbey.  So grateful to the Holy Spirit for Bishop Philip and prayers for Bishop Hollis who would not watch 1 hour with Christ.

  • Parasum

    Agreed, that “subsistit in” & “est” are both needed, because both are true, both are good Christian theology.

    But this Pope asks for trouble by denying supersessionism. I’ll deny that when I become a Jew, not before, because supersessionism (not just fulfilment, because fulfilment implies and takes the form of supersessionism) is the teaching of the NT. The Pope has no authority to tamper with the Gospel, which is “the power of God that brings salvation to all who believe: first to the Jew, then to the Gentile. For in the gospel the righteousness of God is revealed—a righteousness that is by faith from first to last, just as it is written: “The righteous will live by faith.”” If he has authority to tamper with the Gospel of God, he might as well write his own; or throw the Gospel away :(

    The Church, which began with Jewish members, then began to include Gentile believers in Christ whom God grafted on to the old stock of Israel represented by Christian Jews, is the New Israel; to which, in God’s good time, Jews who do not yet believe will be gathered in; not because of their descent, but because they have faith in Christ, the Only Saviour of men. To say the Old Covenant is still in force is to spit on the Cross of Christ, & to deny His Messiahship: which is to deny the Word of God in the NT. 

  • Patrickhowes

    Utter Rubbish.There is nothing “turncoat” about either of the two Bishops you mention.They are of the few who have maintained an orthodox line without flinching throughout their priesthoods.You see it works.With regards to your rather judgemental comment about “abuse scandals”,peadophilia is a human sickness.The fact that it affected priests and it was covered up for decades is the real sin.Judge the sin and not the sinner!And actually try and feel compassion for people who are obviously very sick. Indeed.Cardinal Martini will have represented many good things but one can never attempt to start making theories up that are not supported in the Gospels.Christ clearly states in the NT that he came to reform the law of Moses and that Divorce is unacceptable.It is part of God´s plan that we love once.In fact,the ones who matter,the children, love it and grow up stable and emotionally secure.It is hardly Christ-like to want to change what he gave his life for,is it?.

  • Patrickhowes

    I would also add that Catholic thinking is that God is three in one.The Holy Spirit moves us and inspires us and takes us beyond our normal realms.Yet the figures of God the Father and Son are also important!.God the Father created the ten commandments and Christ gave us the Sacraments.I take your point about people thinking that Baptism alone is not enough to save us.This is why the Catholic Church attaches so much importance.That we shold have a deep sacramental experience with God and that it is the Sacraments that keep us committed and strong.We do have a problem in the Chrch and that is that we seem to fail nowadays with encouraging people to grow in their faith and through the sacraments.It would almost appear that we manage to get our young to confirmation and then they go out into the world and then it dies.Sadly today´s world is one where only the Devil can be happy.People have become soul-less.The Holy Spirit can only work when all other things are in place.It is for this reason that so many good Catholic Saints have been inspired..Holy Communion is the bastion of all the Sacraments as it makes sense of life.The Sacrafice that God was willing to undertake in order to redeem humanity before it was about to destroy itself.”God so Loved the world that he gave his only Son”.

  • Patrickhowes

    Normally always agree with you,but not sure that I would describe the Holy Father in those terms!

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/PWZKI7JBARE4DDT3NQ22RWMOJE Benedict Carter

    Some people would go further, but this is my considered opinion after much reading.

  • Euthebass

    Forgive my ignorance, but can some good person clarify the expression England as “Mary’s dowry”?  Many thanks!

  • rjt1

    A very encouraging, positive statement from the new Bishop.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/PWZKI7JBARE4DDT3NQ22RWMOJE Benedict Carter

    England was once known throughout Europe for the veneration by its people of Mary, the Mother of God. This lasted from the years immediately following England’s conversion to the so-called “Reformation”. A major Marian Shrine existed, and still exists, at Walsingham in Norfolk. 

    Mary Most Holy, convert England your dowry once again to the True Faith.