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Pope Francis ‘appoints management consultant’ to advise on reform of Roman Curia

By on Thursday, 13 June 2013

Pope Francis in St Peter's Square (AP)

Pope Francis in St Peter's Square (AP)

Pope Francis has appointed a management consultant him to advise him on reforming the Church, a leading Vatican observer has reported.

According to Sandro Magister, the Pope “welcomed enthusiastically” the idea of bringing in Thomas von Mitschke-Collande to assist him in streamlining the Roman Curia.

He said the proposal was made by Fr Hans Langerdörfer SJ, secretary of the German bishops’ conference, and supported by Cardinal Reinhard Marx of Munich and Freising, one of the group of eight cardinals advising the Pope.

Dr von Mitschke-Collande was the manager of the Munich branch of the global management consulting firm McKinsey & Company. Last year he published a hard-hitting book in Germany called Schafft sich die katholische Kirche ab?, which can be translated as “Does the Catholic Church want to destroy itself?” or “Is the Catholic Church going out of business?”

Mr Magister said that Dr von Mitschke-Collande helped the Archdiocese of Berlin “get its accounts back in order, and the German episcopal conference asked him to draw up a plan to save on costs and personnel”.

In an interview last year Dr von Mitschke-Collande said the Church in Europe needed to take drastic steps to arrest its decline.

He said: “The Church has no demand problem, but rather a supply problem. It reaches fewer people today, just as they are, with all their hopes and needs. Actually, the Church should be booming. More than ever, people are looking for spirituality, community, and a direction.”

  • kentgeordie

    Socialist twaddle. The answer to poverty is free and intelligent work. If you want to be poor, good luck to you. But there’s a couple of billion people out there that would like to get somewhere near your present standard of living, and the likes of McKinsey & Co can help.

  • dpharisee2010

    Like the scandal: if you were the one hiring them at the time and they confessed to you they were pedophiles, would you have let them in or taken them anyway or you would have thought about it first and asked yourself what does the word mean and is it harmful? Penn State do not know that of Sandausky either. It took 45 counts out of 48. Is there any scandal in the church that with any singular priest more than 45 counts that was PROVEN?.

  • kentgeordie

    Not rottenness, just normal human fallenness. And more like two thousand, not just fifty.

  • Hermit Crab

    …….. “the likes of McKinsey & Co can help”. Perhaps. But they serve themselves first. They serve mammon before they serve God.

  • WG Grace

    No, Geordie, what’s happened inside the Church these last decades is the bursting inside of a great pustulant ulcer which has given the entire organism blood poisoning.

  • WG Grace

    The Catholic Church doesn’t another arch heseriarch. She has plenty of Her own.

  • WG Grace

    I agree that we are seeing in our own very sad days the Great Apostasy. Am convinced of it.

  • kentgeordie

    Colourful metaphor, but unconvincing. When I look at the Church I see all the bad things you see, and it’s awful, but there is also a huge amount of goodness, at all levels, of countless varieties.
    As the recent tv documentary on Rome reminds us, sin has been around for some time.

  • Tom_mcewen

    I don’t agree with those who think the Pope is going outside the Church to some secular management group. From the words from the Dr Collande, he sounds like the caring laymen who love the church and want only the best for the Church. He sounds like a person bringing his best gifts to the altar. We are all called to serve the Church, me in painting, another in prayer, another in priesthood, we all serve just in different ways. I thank God for those who love the church in season and out of season.

  • Tom_mcewen

    God save us from another Martin Luther, this man was poison. Any Priest like Luther who says if you do not have the mistress of the house, you always have the maid, or sin big, if you murder one, murder thousands, why because you could not lose your salvation because the blood of Christ covers your sin. That is making God into a slave. No more Martin Luther, if one’s actions served the Devil it was him.

  • Tom_mcewen

    In the house serving her mother in law would have been the wife, no wife to serve the Lord nor Peter, it was not until the Lord healed the mother-in-law that she rose and was able to served them. It seems to be more reasonable that Peter was a widower, with only his mother-in-law to order his household because his wife was dead, or the dog that did not bark.

  • Justin Case

    Benedict, if you are not sure that JP II tried then you did not follow his work. You did not read the thousands of things he wrote, taught, or spoke about. JP II was loved for his Christ-like disposition but his teaching was either ignored and/or spun into a “hermeneutic of rupture” just like the documents of Vatican II. The anti-Vatican culture started under Paul VI and continues to this day, it’s time to end the rebellion! JP II on commenting of the schism of the St. Pious X society also mentioned the “de-facto schism” of most of the rest of the church, which was giving Vatican II “lip service” that is; not following the council’s documents, but following the spirit of rupture, following a new “man made” spirituality, serving man more than God. If you had read all of JP II’s works utilizing a “hermeneutic of continuity” you would discover that the abuse of the sacred rights (mass & sacraments) was (and is) thousands of times worse than the abuse of children. My guess is by not paying attention to the words of the popes (the universal church) you are a victim to the abuse of your own soul by being denied the true faith by your local church. This is the exact reason pope (emeritus) Benedict has us now in the middle of the “Year of Faith”. Most parishes are spinning this also into a hermeneutic of rupture”. Most parishes are too deep into their Protestant culture to do as the DOCUMENTS of Vatican II say. Start reading and you will discover (most) Catholics have been following a false faith since Vatican II ended.

  • George Gallant

    This is a sensitive issue for Pope Francis. He has advisors who are pointing him in the right direction .He will do what is in the interest of the Living Church. The Vatican Curia will be restructured and reassignments will be the order of the day. Heads will roll and a sense of morality will once again be restored to the Roman Curia .Pope Francis has the support of the people ,who are the church . God is not interested in Gold and Wealth but in the souls of men. God is spirit ,the Creator of all. The need for a transparent Curia is evident in the scandal that plagues the Vatican.

  • Mark

    “So why isn’t the Church booming? Fifty years of rottenness.” Yeah, right Benedict, people are abandoning any belief whatsoever in the sacraments and Christianity because of some bad priests they read about on the internet. People barely have lukewarm faith in the first place and are just waiting for something or someone to blame so they can assuage their consciences after blowing off the sacraments for their Sunday barbecue rituals. Nice try, doesn’t wash.

  • Justin Case

    The pope did not hire the “company” he hired the Catholic author who USED to work for the company ( “Dr von Mitschke-Collande “WAS” the manager”) do we know what “was” means??? and he also wrote a book on the church which has probably NOT been read by those making judgments. Critics abound, but most remain ignorant of the facts, the church, the faith, or all three. Most people today do not make educated judgments, they simply comment based on ? bias?, hearsay?, lifestyle?, or whatever ??. Just keep spinning folks!

  • Justin Case

    The Apostles “left ALL” and followed Christ. The Sacrament of “Holy Orders” is the marriage of a man to the church. A priest sacramentally represents Christ who is married to his bride, the church. “Matrimony” is the sacrament where a man and woman are joined to each other. They are very similar sacraments where two are joined forever, So the clergy are NOT “left out”, both Sacraments are a “gift from God” The priest is to love his bride (the church) and remain loyal to her (celibacy) just as a husband is to not cheat on his wife. “Normal and acceptable” constantly changes, so that is not a good reason to alter anything. The church only needs to “look” (be) holy, not necessarily “acceptable”. By the way, did Matt. 8:14 say Peters wife was still alive?, or are you just assuming it? One can have a mother-in-law and be a widower. The bible leaves many things “wide open” which is why Christ gave us the Catholic church as our living guide and official interpreter of Holy scripture.

  • firstparepidemos

    “an entire generation of useless, heretical and homosexual bishops and cardinals”? Gosh, perhaps you need to cut down on your wild generalisations.

  • firstparepidemos

    “Every” pope?

  • firstparepidemos

    Care to explain exactly how Hermit’s comment is “socialist”?

  • firstparepidemos

    Along with many self-appointed guardians of orthodoxy.

  • Benedict Carter

    Who appointed all the heretics and homosexuals to Bishoprics of Holy Mother Church?

    The SSPX aren’t in schism. Their’s is a condition called “canonical irregularity”.

    You last two sentences are correct but your deification of JPII I just cannot bring myself to agree to – despite having a strong personal reason for wanting to.

  • firstparepidemos

    Celibacy is, indeed, a wonderful gift. However, let us not forget that millions of Eastern Rite Catholics have married priests, as do our Orthodox brethren; this is a much older tradition than mandatory celibacy. As for the Church becoming pagan that is not possible for 2 reasons: it is a contradiction in terms and Christ Himself promised that the gates of hell will not prevail against the Church.

  • firstparepidemos

    Actually, Chris, mandatory celibacy is not Church doctrine, but a human discipline. Celibacy, whilst praiseworthy, is not integral to the Priesthood; this is why our Eastern Rite Catholics and Orthodox brethren have mostly married priests.

  • firstparepidemos

    Fr. John, Thank you for your very courteous response to a rather rude post by Editor CT

  • Justin Case

    I started reading “church documents” and the popes after surviving Vietnam and returning home to a “NEW” church more than 40 years ago. The reading caused me to fall in love with the church and at the same time hating the disobedience and sinfulness of her clergy. Thus my title “disappointed Catholic”. Forty-plus years of reading is a lot of information, and too much certainly for this space. All I can say to you is; To love the church is to love Christ. I wish there were a way we could do a more personal communication on this. Reading is essential to faith!

  • Hermit Crab

    It is likely that Dr von Mitschke-Collande will be involved in deciding whom to hire, to work with him and the Pope in sorting out the Vatican. We don’t know who this will be, and I accept that I unfairly assumed it would be McKinsey & Co.

    Let us assume the best of Dr von Mitschke-Collande. Afterall, as Dr Johnson said: ” There are few ways in which a man can be more innocently employed than in getting money.”

    From the article, we know this about Dr von Mitschke-Collande:
    - that the title of his book may be translated as “Is the Catholic Church going out of business?”
    - that he helped the Archdiocese of Berlin “get its accounts back in order.”
    - that the German episcopal conference asked him to draw up a plan “to save on costs and personnel.”
    - and that he said: “the Church has no demand problem, but rather a supply problem.”

    Doesn’t all this sound to you like mammon talking? Do you think it is going to solve the real problems in the Church? Wasn’t it Marx who explained everything in terms of economics?

  • JuanOskar JayMaynes

    I’ve always been amazed at how the our bishops and priests can make the most interesting topic in the universe sooo boring.

  • Justin Case

    It Could, and yet it couldn’t. We do know he has a very dependable eight bishops along with this one laymen so far, but that is all we know. I usually try to be patient and not jump to conclusions, so for me, I will wait and see, and if they error as they did in the implementation of Vatican II. Then I will make my discernment. Most of the “real problems” are disobedience by the local churches anyway.

  • Patricia

    We love the catholic church.
    We have no problems whatsoever with anything it teaches, on the contrary.
    But what we find very disturbing are the constant and regular attacks on the moral teachings of the church: when several high ranking officials, one after the other, is announcing how much they are longing and craving for the acceptance of gay relations and same sex unions.
    Of course, they always assure us that “it can never have the same value or position as traditional marriage”, but only someone very naive could trust them and their intensions.
    This is the way totalitarian regimes always have worked; socialism, communism, politically correct systems; all of them disguise ther true aims behind sweet assurances and promises.
    This is just”THE TERRORISM OF SMALL STEPS”. And, slowly, slowly, people’s understanding of what is right and wrong will erode. and years after, nobody will know how it could have happened.
    At least now we know who the enemies of wonderful pope em Benedict XVI are and that the rumours of a homosexual “mafia” among high ranking officials are true rumours.

  • kentgeordie

    Hermit is implying that McKinsey = mammon = wicked exploitation of the vulnerable.
    I am implying that McKinsey = free market economy = less poverty, and that “socialism” = poverty and loss of freedom.
    Socialism is not a good theory with bad effects. It’s a bad theory with bad effects. Christian socialism is a contradiction in terms.

    You can certainly serve God and mammon, provided you put God first. But you cannot serve God and the party – both demand absolute allegiance.

    A free economy does not ensure the common good – we also need Christian principles – but a socialist economy ensures that the common good will not and cannot be achieved.

  • Benedict Carter

    Dear Disappointed, a very good friend of mine living in Fatima is a former colleague of yours perhaps, a Marine who did a couple of Vietnam tours. You can reach me on bencarter@mail.ru

  • Hermit Crab

    I agree with everything you say about socialism and mammon. Let us hope that Mckinsey, or whoever, do put God first.

  • firstparepidemos

    I’m wondering whether you live in the US because I’m thinking that you are possibly confusing socialism with atheistic communism; the former can be democratic and open to faith while the latter is not (as we saw in the USSR).
    Whilst I certainly believe in the value of the market economy, I disagree that we can equally serve both God and mammon and accept the scriptural admonition on this matter. God must come first and, by extension, care for His children, but especially those who are vulnerable and dispossessed (cf Matthew 25). I am far from convinced that the free market economy – such as I experienced in the US – rises to that challenge.
    This is an observation and not an endorsement of any political system. Whilst I realise that Catholicism does not sanction any particular political system, I find it interesting to see how often Pope Francis has been chastising those who seek money, power and prestige. I certainly reject the “prosperity Gospel” preached by so many US tele-evangelists.