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Pope Francis allows Catholics to join the ordinariate

By on Friday, 12 July 2013

Mgr Keith Newton with other ordinariate priests at Our Lady of Assumption church in Soho (Photo: Lorna Moffat)

Mgr Keith Newton with other ordinariate priests at Our Lady of Assumption church in Soho (Photo: Lorna Moffat)

Pope Francis has widened the remit of the world’s Personal Ordinariates by allowing Catholics who have been baptised but not yet confirmed to become members.

Previously, only former Anglicans and their family members could join the ordinariates.

A statement from the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham said the change gave new scope for ordinariate members to evangelise.

The amendment, it said, “confirms the place of the Personal Ordinariates within the mission of the wider Catholic Church, not simply as a jurisdiction for those from the Anglican tradition, but as a contributor to the urgent work of the New Evangelisation”.

It added that Catholics “may not become members of a Personal Ordinariate ‘for purely subjective motives or personal preference”.

  • teigitur

    Good news indeed.

  • NatOns

    Looking at the rampant heresy, disobedience and confusion of my local parishes – let alone the whole Catholic Church witnessing in Ireland – I for one would gladly seek membership of the Ordinarate to seek refuge and avoid the occasion of sin even though I am a Baptised, Confirmed and Communicant Catholic .. being left awash in the Irish (free state/ independent republic/ Age of Aquarius) form of the Roman Rite (sic).

    http://www.churchservices.tv/alphonsus/recorded/8ailHgS

    Again, I choose only one of the very best, most reverent and sincere liturgies.

  • teigitur

    You are so right. If there was an Ordinariate Mass anywhere near I would attend every week, but alas the nearest is a long way off, as is the nearest EF Mass thanks to our local Bishop.

  • johnhenry

    I’m a former Anglican, who was confirmed in a regular Catholic parish. I wonder if this decree would permit me to join an Ordinariate parish. I don’t think so. Not that I even want to. Just wondering…

  • Adam

    I believe as a former Anglican you could join from day one :-)

  • Cestius

    As another former Anglican, the way that I read it, the answer is no. But of course there’s no reason why you cannot attend ordinariate services and receive communion there, so it probably makes little difference in practice.

  • NatOns

    Cestius, an ex-Anglican still in opposition to and rebellion from the Roman Church cannot receive communion in any Orthodox Catholic Rite – whether Western, Eastern or Oriental in tradition. The Ordinariate is not an approved sort of Old Catholic Church beside the Roman Church, it is part of the Catholic Church in communion with Rome .. one must, therefore, profess this communion in good faith. Of course John Henry could share in the Ordinariate’s services, as any soul may, this does validate or permit any fast and loose personal ‘communion’ in the Protestant sense of sharing in the communal presence of Christ at His Eucharist, it requires full affirmation of the Catholic Faith without demur, tweaking or side-stepping (for that sort of D-I-Y type of thing just go to any ordinary Age-of-Aquarius, hippydom, We-Are-Church Catholic parish) .. and that affirmation includes fidelity to the Rite into which one is confirmed (even if it is a D-I-Y, A-of-A, hippydom etc).

  • Cestius

    I was referring to ex-Anglicans that have already been received into the (RC) Church like myself.

  • AlanP

    It’s probably my ignorance, but I simply don’t understand this. If the Ordinariate is an organisation within the Catholic Church, and if we are free to attend its Masses, why are we not allowed to join the actual organisation if we so wish? Why can ex-Anglicans who decided to become Catholics at a particular time become members, but not Anglicans who converted earlier, and not those who were never Anglicans? Am I missing something?

  • http://jabbapapa.wordpress.com/ Julian Lord

    I think that these are some disciplinary matters, that are liable to change even further ; and have been set in place for the time being to placate fears that Catholics in England, for example, might “defect” to the Ordinariate.

    I should imagine that any Catholic with any “grave reasons” for attending Mass at an Ordinariate Church rather than the diocesan parish could do so ; also any Catholic permitted to do so by his or her Bishop ; etc.

  • NatOns

    Quite so, many apologies .. would that a wider still permission could be granted!

  • Cestius

    How many Ordinariate church buildings are there? I was under the impression that the Church of England mostly refuses to let parishes that leave to join the RC Ordinariate keep their old buildings, so most of them will be sharing existing RC parish churches and mass centers. So presumably the Ordinariate mass is in the same building as the regular mass, just at a different time.

  • Francis Benedict

    The Ordinariate always seemed to me that it was for disaffected Anglicans who wanted to continue being Anglicans (from which they had become disaffected), rather than take the grown-up leap and embrace the Roman Catholic Church, it’s traditions and teachings. Now that surely would be the sensible thing to do, rather than set up yet another ‘group’

  • http://jabbapapa.wordpress.com/ Julian Lord

    Yes indeed, and all that sort of rubbish.

  • Gabriella Valente

    I am having a hard time understanding any of this, could someone point me to a site which contains a clear explanation? Thanks

  • liquafruta

    I agree with you. None of this makes any sense whatsoever.

  • liquafruta

    I wouldn’t waste your energy as it is totally incomprehensible to me as well. I am always being told that if you are a Catholic you can’t pick and choose what you believe

  • http://jabbapapa.wordpress.com/ Julian Lord

    http://www.ordinariate.org.uk/faq

    12. Can any Catholic be able to [sic] attend a Mass celebrated within an Ordinariate Group or by an Ordinariate priest?

    Yes. Any Catholic, whether a member of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham or a member of a diocese, can attend Mass, receive Holy Communion and participate in the liturgies of an Ordinariate Group or those celebrated by an Ordinariate priest.

    Similarly, registered members of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham are free to attend Mass, receive Holy Communion and participate in the liturgies of any Catholic Church.

    The article describes a change in the rules governing who may become a registered member of an Ordinariate group.

  • Tristan

    I’m not sure how you came to that conclusion, FB, as that doesn’t seem to be the situation of the Ordinariate, at least from my perspective (which is that of Anglican, in Communion with Canterbury.)

    Members of the Ordinariate have taken the leap of becoming full members of the RCC – and signing up to the Catechism – but they are a small part of the RCC which retains a certain liturgical and pastoral Anglican flavour, but they are without a doubt, full members of the RCC.

  • Tristan

    Whilst this is being triumphed as the Great Evangelistic Move of our time, how many Catholics can there *really* be who have been baptised but not Confirmed, and/or received First Holy Communion? Surely the number isn’t that large…

  • LocutusOP

    That is correct.

  • LocutusOP

    The Ordinariate has the same faith as the rest of the Catholic Church, but is in itself a small part of the Latin Church.

    It’s not a question of picking and choosing what to believe, but rather attending a different kind of liturgy.

  • LocutusOP

    It’s not huge but they are there and if this has been the only stumbling block before now they have no excuse whatsoever.

  • http://jabbapapa.wordpress.com/ Julian Lord

    The number of Baptised who have never received the Sacrament of Confirmation is, in reality, HUGE.

  • liquafruta

    And what about the celibacy of the clergy?

  • http://jabbapapa.wordpress.com/ Julian Lord

    And what about the celibacy of the clergy?

    Seminarians hoping to be ordained as priests of the Ordinariate must be celibate, though I believe that one individual exception of someone who is in a special case has been permitted by the Holy See (I believe he had already commenced the process of discernment, but without having been formally accepted as a seminarian when the Ordinariate was established — interestingly, he is AFAIK the first Catholic seminarian since perhaps the 18th century to have been provided with such a particular dispensation of celibacy).

  • Tristan

    Within the broad reaches of Christendom, yes – but the Complementary Norms revised by +Francis state that this is in specific reference to lapsed members of the Catholic Church. Are there really that many lapsed Catholics who were baptised but never Confirmed? I’ll happily be corrected, but I don’t think I’ve met many…

  • LocutusOP

    There are quite a lot I should imagine. I suppose they would typically be the children of nominal Catholics.

    I am one of those currently working my way through to Confirmation, having never received First Communion or Confirmation in my youth and I imagine there are many others in the same boat.

    That being written, whether a lot of them would prefer to join the Ordinariate is a different matter but the point is that if that was an obstacle, it needn’t be any more. Even if it’s only 50 people it’s 50 souls which could potentially be saved.

    A correction….I’m not sure these people can really be called lapsed Catholics if they were never raised in the faith to begin with. They are simply Catholics who have not been fully initiated for the most part due to ‘parental neglicence’ – for lack of a better term.

  • Anne

    Please pray for an Ordinariate in Ireland.

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