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Print edition 06.07.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Mary O’Regan reports on 10 of the world’s most amazing priests; Fr Tim Gardner OP, secretary of the bishops’ Department for Catholic Education and Formation, says our ignorance would make Aquinas pull his hair out; Tim Stanley writes about conspiracists who believe Obama is on the size of the lizards; and Anna Arco reports from a country where liturgical dance is OK. Patricia Routledge, meanwhile, tells Isabel Westby why she loves the nuns at Stanbrook Abbey. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 29.06.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Mgr Guido Marini talks to Edward Pentin about life as the Pope’s liturgist; Piers Paul Read defends the papacy’s record on Jews; Cristina Odone says it’s becoming socially unacceptable to speak up for marriage; and economist Philip Booth argues that Church leaders are evading the issue of tax avoidance (and with good reason). Prison chaplain Fr David Palmer, meanwhile, reports that young black Catholics in jail are turning to Islam. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 22.06.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, we publish a four-page guide to the visit of St John Vianney’s heart to England; Fr James Martin SJ writes about the world’s funniest saints; Hugo Lesser reports on the Marian shrine in Argentina where no one sells anything; and scripture scholar Fr Jerome Murphy-O’Connor argues that Jesus had a breakdown in the Garden of Gethsemane. Other guest contributors include Bishop Mark Davies of Shrewsbury, Sir Mark Allen, and Dom Leo Maidlow Davis. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 15.06.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, we unveil our free online archive dating back to 1935; Eamon Duffy says ‘revisionist’ history of the Reformation has no papistical axe to grind; Ed West speaks to John Foppe, whose faith has helped him become a father, speaker and leader despite being born with no arms; and Simon Caldwell writes about the London nun who saw the Host turn into flesh. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 08.06.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Damian Thompson argues Benedict XVI is the first pontiff of the age of addiction; Freddy Gray admits he may be a treacherous papist; Will Gore meets Peter Hutley, the businessman and convert who is staging some of the biggest biblical plays ever seen in Britain; and Fr Michael G Murphy and Fr Julian Large write about the power of the Blessed Sacrament on the eve of the 50th International Eucharistic Congress. Jack Carrigan, meanwhile, enjoys a memoir by the Pope’s brother. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 01.06.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Mary Kenny argues the Queen has helped British Catholics rise above centuries of prejudice; Tim Stanley meets Bill Donohue, America’s most vocal defender of the faith; Cardinal Scola advises troubled couples; and James Le Fanu says we have roughly the same number of genes as a millimetre-long worm without a brain. Jack Scarisbrick, meanwhile, reports on the consequences of China’s one-child policy; and Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith explains how we can insult people without sinning. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 25.05.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Iain Duncan Smith defends his welfare reforms against critics both inside and outside his party; Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor hails Norman St John-Stevas as a man of dazzling wit and devotion; Rachel Johnson attends a joyful wedding with no chocolate fountain in sight; and Bishop Macram Max Gassis tells Ed West that his diocese is ridden by war and slavery. Paul Johnson, meanwhile, says secularism doomed the EU to failure. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 18.05.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Garry Wills writes about the world’s most intriguing holy place; Catherine Lafferty meets Therese Coffey, the MP who loves the traditional Mass; and Fr Anthony Symondson marvels at Leonardo’s joyous drawings of the unborn. Andrew M Brown, meanwhile, says that at Catholic schools, a Lexus means nothing. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 11.05.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Fr Timothy Radcliffe says that Jesus’s message of non-violence is so radical we still haven’t grasped it properly; Lord Alton writes about his efforts to save pro-life activist Chen Guangcheng; Mary Kenny visits a desert monastery; Simon Caldwell meets Louise Kirk, the mother of four taking on the sex ed establishment; and Michelin-starred chef Richard Corrigan argues that family meals are crucial to our well-being.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 04.05.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Julie Etchingham meets an English victim of trafficking who is addressing a Vatican conference next week; Ann Carey explains why the Vatican has decided to act over the Leadership Conference of Women Religious; Charlie Hegarty delivers leaflets in defence of marriage; and Ed West says having children changes your politics for good. Robin Baird-Smith, meanwhile, argues in favour of silence.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.