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Print edition 14.12.12

Only a small selection of stories from the print edition of The Catholic Herald is published online for free. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

This week, Cardinal Scola tells Luke Coppen that the controversy over the Pope’s Regensburg lecture has made dialogue with Muslims easier; Mark Shea says US drone strikes are claiming innocent lives; Jenny McCartney laments the loss of the ‘Just say no’ message on drugs; and Lisa Green says that caring for Raphael, her terminally ill baby, was the most precious time of her life. Plus, Lord Deben argues that the women bishops saga proves St Thomas More was right about Parliament.

Print edition 07.12.12

Only a small selection of stories from the print edition of The Catholic Herald is published online for free. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

This week, novelist Matt Thorne suggests Mary Whitehouse was the greatest 1970s rebel; Rory Fitzgerald argues that abortion campaigners have spun a false narrative over Savita’s sad death; William Oddie assesses the Pope’s new book; Mgr Andrew Wadsworth marks the new Mass translation’s first birthday; and Daniel Kalder ponders the end of the world.

Print edition 30.11.12

Only a small selection of stories from the print edition of The Catholic Herald is published online for free. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

This week, Stuart Reid meets Fr Stephen Langridge, the priest who doubled his congregation and is inspiring new vocations; Joseph Pearce says JRR Tolkien’s The Hobbit contains a profoundly Catholic message; Melanie McDonagh argues that the C of E’s umbilical tie to the state looks more like a noose; and Fr Tim Finigan explains what the Church asks Catholics to believe, and what beliefs are, in fact, optional. Meanwhile, in our free 20-page supplement, writers in Bethlehem, Turkey and Lebanon guide you through Advent.

Print edition 23.11.12

This week, Paul Johnson explains what he would do if he had a spare billion pounds; Andrew M Brown takes a journey back in time to Scotland’s Catholic heartland; Miguel Cullen meets former atheist poet Sally Read, who found her faith in Liverpool St station; and Pastor Iuventus says every night is a death rehearsal. Daniel Kalder, meanwhile, reports on the gamblers, gunslingers and philanderers who took an unlikely path to Rome.

You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 16.11.12

This week, George Pitcher says the new Archbishop of Canterbury is a better class of Etonian; Fr Aidan Nichols OP says we should see Vatican II in the light of eternity, rather than through the prism of 1960s politics; Baroness Berridge explains how we can make a difference to Middle East Christians; and Angelo Stagnaro says Dorothy Day shows that even anarchists who promote abortion can become saint material. Patricia Chalé and Cliff Rich, meanwhile, explain how to rescue elderly people from loneliness.

You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 09.11.12

This week, Conrad Black explains why he took on the British media; Fr Christopher Jamison says a ‘culture of vocation’ is booming in parishes; Siobhann Tighe meets Fr Kevin Burke, a straight-talking, cheroot-smoking missionary in the South Pacific; Freddy Gray reports on an NHS campaign that is freaking him out; and Patrick Reyntiens says Rothko’s late paintings are unforgettable. Meanwhile, on the eve of Remembrance Day, Stephen Cooper traces the life of an Ampleforth boy who fell in a hail of fire in the First World War.

You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 02.11.12

 

This week Edward Leigh MP explains why he opposed the Iraq War, Rupert Shortt reports on Christian persecution around the world and Piers Paul Read explains that marriage is the hard road to happiness. We also report on how new two-child benefit limits could lead to an abortion rise, and Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor’s criticism of the prison system.

You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 26.10.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week Mary McAleese, former Irish head of state, says the Church shouldn’t be relying on one man’s brainpower; ITV presenter Julie Etchingham explains why she is terrified of US election night; Daniel Hannan argues the laity will never share the bishops’ love for the EU; Tim Stanley says George Osborne’s ticket fiasco was the moral equivalent of Watergate; and Theodore Dalrymple reflects on the best work of art in half a millennium. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 19.10.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, A N Wilson says that Chaucer was the Jimmy Savile of his time; Rosa Monckton tells Dominie Stemp why she is making a stand for the disabled; and John Polkinghorne, a theoretical physicist and Anglican priest, argues that Stephen Hawking was wrong to rule out a Creator. Plus, John Allen says Catholics could decide Obama’s fate; and Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith explains why he loves the film Titanic. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 12.10.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Dennis Sewell says we must resist schadenfreude over the BBC’s abuse crisis; Stuart Reid prays outside an abortion clinic; Melanie McDonagh urges Catholics to defy groupthink; and Bess Twiston Davies meets the young Catholic choreographer who says he has a vocation to change our ideas about dance. Patrick West, meanwhile, reflects on the shrinking limits of free speech; and Edward Pentin says after the successful trial of Paolo Gabriele, Vatican staff must now be held to account. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).