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Print edition 09.11.12

This week, Conrad Black explains why he took on the British media; Fr Christopher Jamison says a ‘culture of vocation’ is booming in parishes; Siobhann Tighe meets Fr Kevin Burke, a straight-talking, cheroot-smoking missionary in the South Pacific; Freddy Gray reports on an NHS campaign that is freaking him out; and Patrick Reyntiens says Rothko’s late paintings are unforgettable. Meanwhile, on the eve of Remembrance Day, Stephen Cooper traces the life of an Ampleforth boy who fell in a hail of fire in the First World War.

You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 02.11.12

 

This week Edward Leigh MP explains why he opposed the Iraq War, Rupert Shortt reports on Christian persecution around the world and Piers Paul Read explains that marriage is the hard road to happiness. We also report on how new two-child benefit limits could lead to an abortion rise, and Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor’s criticism of the prison system.

You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 26.10.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week Mary McAleese, former Irish head of state, says the Church shouldn’t be relying on one man’s brainpower; ITV presenter Julie Etchingham explains why she is terrified of US election night; Daniel Hannan argues the laity will never share the bishops’ love for the EU; Tim Stanley says George Osborne’s ticket fiasco was the moral equivalent of Watergate; and Theodore Dalrymple reflects on the best work of art in half a millennium. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 19.10.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, A N Wilson says that Chaucer was the Jimmy Savile of his time; Rosa Monckton tells Dominie Stemp why she is making a stand for the disabled; and John Polkinghorne, a theoretical physicist and Anglican priest, argues that Stephen Hawking was wrong to rule out a Creator. Plus, John Allen says Catholics could decide Obama’s fate; and Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith explains why he loves the film Titanic. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 12.10.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Dennis Sewell says we must resist schadenfreude over the BBC’s abuse crisis; Stuart Reid prays outside an abortion clinic; Melanie McDonagh urges Catholics to defy groupthink; and Bess Twiston Davies meets the young Catholic choreographer who says he has a vocation to change our ideas about dance. Patrick West, meanwhile, reflects on the shrinking limits of free speech; and Edward Pentin says after the successful trial of Paolo Gabriele, Vatican staff must now be held to account. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 05.10.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, in a commemorative issue marking 50 years since the opening of the Second Vatican Council, 16 writers reflect on its 16 texts. Contributors include Cardinal Murphy-O’Connor, Archbishop Nichols and Bishop Davies. Meanwhile, Dr Edward Norman, a leading Church historian and former Canon Chancellor of York Minster, writes about why he is joining the Catholic Church; Cardinal Pell argues that from Roman times the Church has always promoted women’s wellbeing; and Will Gore says that beneath Jack Kerouac’s hedonism lay a deeply Catholic soul. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 28.09.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week Archbishop Charles Brown, the nuncio to Ireland, tells Mary O’Regan about being bounced on Dorothy Day’s knee; Fr Richard Ounsworth assesses Geza Vermes’s brilliant but dangerous new book; and John Gummer argues that going green is pro-life. Baroness Hollins, meanwhile, says Britain is pushing disabled people to the margins, and Philip Booth suggests Ed Miliband’s big new idea is, in fact, borrowed from the Catholic Church. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 21.09.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Daniel Kawczynski MP urges Britain not to abandon Libya; Fr Andrew Browne recalls his struggle to comfort families after the Hillsborough disaster; Simon Caldwell says Eamon Duffy’s new history exposes the horrors of the Reformation; and Rhoslyn Thomas braves downpours and blisters on an arduous pilgrimage to Walsingham. Fr Augustine Aoun, meanwhile, says Benedict XVI gave Lebanon’s young people a tornado’s worth of joy. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 14.09.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Bishop Kieran Conry says British Catholics should get ready for a new springtime; Lord Patten tells Luke Coppen that some Vatican officials were surprised by the success of the papal visit; Andrew M Brown predicts that it will be a hard century to be a man; and Piers Paul Read says the arts won’t save your soul. Edward Pentin, meanwhile, notes that even Hezbollah is welcoming Benedict XVI’s forthcoming visit to Lebanon. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 07.09.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Paul Johnson recalls the day an archbishop burned his writings in front of a cheering mob; Tim Stanley assesses Paul Ryan; Madeleine Teahan says Britain doesn’t really welcome disabled people; Fr Simon Penhalagan describes an incredible experiment in evangelisation; and Michael Wenham, who has Motor Neurone Disease, writes about meeting Tony Nicklinson. Plus, we offer an extra four-and-a-half-page guide to some of England’s best Catholic schools. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).