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Print edition 01.06.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Mary Kenny argues the Queen has helped British Catholics rise above centuries of prejudice; Tim Stanley meets Bill Donohue, America’s most vocal defender of the faith; Cardinal Scola advises troubled couples; and James Le Fanu says we have roughly the same number of genes as a millimetre-long worm without a brain. Jack Scarisbrick, meanwhile, reports on the consequences of China’s one-child policy; and Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith explains how we can insult people without sinning. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 25.05.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Iain Duncan Smith defends his welfare reforms against critics both inside and outside his party; Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor hails Norman St John-Stevas as a man of dazzling wit and devotion; Rachel Johnson attends a joyful wedding with no chocolate fountain in sight; and Bishop Macram Max Gassis tells Ed West that his diocese is ridden by war and slavery. Paul Johnson, meanwhile, says secularism doomed the EU to failure. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 18.05.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Garry Wills writes about the world’s most intriguing holy place; Catherine Lafferty meets Therese Coffey, the MP who loves the traditional Mass; and Fr Anthony Symondson marvels at Leonardo’s joyous drawings of the unborn. Andrew M Brown, meanwhile, says that at Catholic schools, a Lexus means nothing. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 11.05.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Fr Timothy Radcliffe says that Jesus’s message of non-violence is so radical we still haven’t grasped it properly; Lord Alton writes about his efforts to save pro-life activist Chen Guangcheng; Mary Kenny visits a desert monastery; Simon Caldwell meets Louise Kirk, the mother of four taking on the sex ed establishment; and Michelin-starred chef Richard Corrigan argues that family meals are crucial to our well-being.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 04.05.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Julie Etchingham meets an English victim of trafficking who is addressing a Vatican conference next week; Ann Carey explains why the Vatican has decided to act over the Leadership Conference of Women Religious; Charlie Hegarty delivers leaflets in defence of marriage; and Ed West says having children changes your politics for good. Robin Baird-Smith, meanwhile, argues in favour of silence.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 27.04.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Piers Paul Read suggests young people understand what is good, but not what is holy; John Gummer says talk of homosexuality as an illness or lifestyle choice undermines efforts to protect marriage; Rory Fitzgerald meets Clive Dytor, the Oratory headmaster whose faith began on the battlefield; June Rockett argues that the triumphalist 1908 Eucharistic Congress in London set back the Church in Britain for decades; and Pastor Iuventus is inspired by a wonderful evangelisation project in Soho.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 20.04.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, theologian and SNP member Glen Reynolds argues that Catholics would thrive in an independent Scotland; whistleblower Mark Dooley says Ireland needs holy priests, not clerical celebrities; and Daniel Kalder reports on the Catholic ‘prophets’ who inspired the Lord’s Resistance Army in Uganda. Anna Arco, meanwhile, writes about a joyful Easter spent with the Pope; and Pastor Iuventus asks if Jesus would feel at home in Rome.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 13.04.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Cardinal Angelo Scola says families hold our fragmented society together; Fr Stewart Foster remembers the priests on the Titanic who spent their final moments hearing Confessions and leading the rosary; Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith offers advice for parishes afflicted by ‘pew rage’; and Freddy Gray responds to blogger Andrew Sullivan over his call to ‘Forget the Church, follow Christ’. Melanie McDonagh, meanwhile, says now is the time for Catholics to gorge on chocolate.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 06.04.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Roger Scruton argues that consumerism is a bigger threat to Christianity than new atheism; Conrad Black asks if the Pope’s trip to Cuba was a success; Pastor Iuventus reports from Bedford Square; and Fr Robert Barron says he fears The Hunger Games could become a reality. Fr Dwight Longenecker, meanwhile, welcomes the return of bees to the Exsultet.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 30.03.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Fr Vincent Twomey tells Rory Fitzgerald that he was a Sixties radical until he met the Pope; Nana Anto-Awuakye meets a family who fled Sudan on a steamer; Mgr Phelim Rowlands writes about seeing the Falklands War up close; and Melanie McDonagh argues that children need more than feel-good catechesis. Mary O’Regan, meanwhile, meets Catholic medical students ready to take a stand for the sanctity of life, even if it hampers their careers. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.