Thu 31st Jul 2014 | Last updated: Thu 31st Jul 2014 at 16:39pm

Facebook Logo Twitter Logo RSS Logo
Hot Topics

Print edition 23.03.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, rock star Dion DiMucci talks to Rory Fitzgerald about meeting Christ on a jog; Archbishop Vincent Nichols of Westminster writes about the Church’s vision for homosexual people; and Simon Caldwell meets the priest who is establishing the first British base for the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest. Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith, meanwhile, says that in time Rowan Williams will be appreciated for the great man he is. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 16.03.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Christopher Howse reveals how many angels fit on a pinhead; Peter D Williams advises readers how to argue against same-sex marriage; Mary O’Regan talks to Katy Robinson, the 22-year-old breaking Belgium’s silence over abortion; Rosamund Urwin praises the BBC documentary Catholics; Michael Coren says Canada’s secularism may lead to better Catholics; and Daniel Kalder writes about Pope Michael I, who lives with his mum. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 09.03.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week former SAS commander Lord Guthrie tells Luke Coppen why he embraced Catholicism; Paul Johnson remembers flooring a bully at Stonyhurst; James MacMillan argues that Catholics cannot trust Alex Salmond; and Miguel Cullen says the dead of El Salvador give him nightmares. Angelo Stagnaro, meanwhile, writes about how mobile phones can help us pray.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 02.03.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Phyllis Bowman talks to Madeleine Teahan about her 45-year ‘battle for the baby’; Cristina Odone admits to a happy afternoon with Dawkins; Daphne McLeod says don’t blame Vatican II for the decline of the Church; and Caroline Farrow suggests that pro-lifers finally have the upper hand. Dom Henry Wansbrough, meanwhile, reflects on the dazzling light of God’s love. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 24.02.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, a hermit explains how she left her job to become a medieval-style anchorite; Roderick O’Donnell hails the furiously creative AWN Pugin, born almost 200 years ago; Dom Henry Wansbrough OSB says Lent doesn’t have to be miserable; Simon Caldwell speaks to Neil Addison, the Catholic barrister struggling to preserve religious freedom in Britain; and Fr Dwight Longenecker says Evangelicals are flocking to the US ordinariate. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 17.02.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, hospital chaplain Fr James Mulligan reports on the rise of the multi-faith prayer room; Fr Christopher Jamison urges young Catholics not to be afraid of Rio in 2013; Mgr Andrew Wadsworth says Lent is a time to go to war with yourself; Russell Sparkes calls for Cardinal Manning to be made a Blessed; and Daniel Kalder writes about the world’s toughest clerics. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 10.02.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Lord Nicholas Windsor tells Peter Stanford about his conversion to Catholicism; Dr Rowan Williams writes that prayer is like being part of a great choir; John Gummer laments the sale of chalices and patens from Ramsgate Abbey; and, on the 200th anniversary of Charles Dickens’s birth, William Oddie recalls the writer’s vision of Our Lady. Patrick Reyntiens, meanwhile, says Hockney’s latest work is like being kicked in the face. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 03.02.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Fr Tim Gardner OP suggests two simple steps to renew our schools; Marie Collins, a clerical abuse victim, tells Madeleine Teahan what she will say to the world’s bishops in Rome next week; Peter Stanford celebrates Cafod’s 50th birthday; Piers Paul Read examines who was to blame for the Dreyfus Affair; and Caroline Farrow calls for a new movement of pro-life feminism.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 27.01.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Oxford historian Peter Frankopan argues that the Crusades demolished Christian unity; Dennis Sewell says Republican hopefuls have to reject the theory of evolution if they want to get elected; Luke Coppen talks to Anne Merriman, the doctor who pioneered palliative care in Africa after a near-death experience; and Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith longs for the wine-and-gondola days of ecumenism. Freddy Gray, meanwhile, reflects on the world’s silliest new religion, Kopimism, which worships file sharing. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 20.01.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, biologist James Hannam argues that the Church inspired the rise of science; William Newton suggests that Catholics can’t trust Wikipedia; Michael Wenham, who has Motor Neurone Disease, says he would dread to live in a society that encouraged assisted suicide; and Will Heaven argues that Downside can emerge stronger from the abuse crisis if it chooses the right reforms. Melanie McDonagh, meanwhile, asks if you would give up your place on a lifeboat. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.