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Print edition 27.01.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Oxford historian Peter Frankopan argues that the Crusades demolished Christian unity; Dennis Sewell says Republican hopefuls have to reject the theory of evolution if they want to get elected; Luke Coppen talks to Anne Merriman, the doctor who pioneered palliative care in Africa after a near-death experience; and Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith longs for the wine-and-gondola days of ecumenism. Freddy Gray, meanwhile, reflects on the world’s silliest new religion, Kopimism, which worships file sharing. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 20.01.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, biologist James Hannam argues that the Church inspired the rise of science; William Newton suggests that Catholics can’t trust Wikipedia; Michael Wenham, who has Motor Neurone Disease, says he would dread to live in a society that encouraged assisted suicide; and Will Heaven argues that Downside can emerge stronger from the abuse crisis if it chooses the right reforms. Melanie McDonagh, meanwhile, asks if you would give up your place on a lifeboat. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 13.01.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Michael Warsaw reveals to Luke Coppen his secret formula for running EWTN; Kevin Myers remembers Ireland’s spurned heroes, who fought the Nazis but were treated as deserters; Felipe Fernández-Armesto says Catholics in the US are embracing the Right; George Pitcher responds to the Falconer report; and Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith reflects on the morality of real-life superheroes.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 06.01.12

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Lord Alton explains why he has hope for North Korea; James Le Fanu says the Achilles’ heel of New Atheists is materialism; Mary Kenny gives thanks for Catholic guilt; and Mary O’Regan talks to Ian Verrier, an English seminarian in the US training to be a priest of the Fraternity of St Peter. Meanwhile, 10 members of the ordinariate describe their journey to full communion with the Catholic Church. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 23.12.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week’s Herald is 44 pages – our biggest ever issue. In it Fr Aidan Nichols writes about how the Incarnation changed the world; Martin Sheen speaks to Gabrielle Donnelly about The Way; Mary O’Regan profiles 10 amazing Catholics; and author Daniel Kalder asks if the world will end in 2012. Other star writers include Fr Robert Barron, papal biographer George Weigel and pianist Stephen Hough. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 16.12.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Joseph Pearce writes about Evelyn Waugh’s love for the Old Mass; Stuart Reid considers Cardinal Siri’s edict on women’s trousers; Michael Brendan Dougherty asks if Newt Gingrich will be America’s next Catholic president; Abbot Aidan Bellenger says the new translation will win over its critics; and Michael Merrick argues that Catholic commentators must be careful not to demonise the Left. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 09.12.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Catholic peer John Gummer takes on Cardinal Pell over climate change; Fr Kevin Doran, secretary general of the 50th International Eucharistic Congress, says the gathering will renew the Church in Ireland; and Rory Fitzgerald talks to Ryan Bomberger, the Emmy Award-winning designer highlighting the impact of abortion on black Americans. Milo Yiannopoulos, meanwhile, offers 10 ways to help others through the financial crisis.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 02.12.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, US presidential challenger Pat Buchanan says western civilisation needs a new St Paul; Miguel Cullen meets Nanni Moretti, the director of a papal conclave comedy that has won a cardinal’s blessing; Sister Janet Fearns writes about religious in Ethiopia helping babies see their second birthday; Fr Anthony Symondson SJ hails Stephen Dykes Bower, the last Gothic master; and Stuart Reid meets an unlikely new traditionalist. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 25.11.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, we print an exclusive extract from Archbishop Nichols’s new book on St John Fisher; Fr Christopher Jamison argues that banking needs a Wilberforce; Theodore Dalrymple laments a modern cult of ugliness; and Magnus Macfarlane-Barrow explains how his charity Mary’s Meals was inspired by Medjugorje. Plus, each paper comes with an extra, 20-page Advent magazine, with contributions from ICEL director Fr Andrew Wadsworth and composer James MacMillan. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 18.11.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Lord Carlile says that every school should learn from the scandal at Ealing; Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith asks if Catholicism is bad for the economy; Caroline Farrow says Catholic women need thick skins online; and Caroline Asquith argues that there is a blind spot among scholars about Shakespeare’s Catholic faith. Fr Anthony Symondson, meanwhile, visits the National Gallery’s once-in-a-lifetime Leonardo da Vinci show.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.