Tue 30th Sep 2014 | Last updated: Tue 30th Sep 2014 at 14:53pm

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Print edition 23.12.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week’s Herald is 44 pages – our biggest ever issue. In it Fr Aidan Nichols writes about how the Incarnation changed the world; Martin Sheen speaks to Gabrielle Donnelly about The Way; Mary O’Regan profiles 10 amazing Catholics; and author Daniel Kalder asks if the world will end in 2012. Other star writers include Fr Robert Barron, papal biographer George Weigel and pianist Stephen Hough. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 16.12.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Joseph Pearce writes about Evelyn Waugh’s love for the Old Mass; Stuart Reid considers Cardinal Siri’s edict on women’s trousers; Michael Brendan Dougherty asks if Newt Gingrich will be America’s next Catholic president; Abbot Aidan Bellenger says the new translation will win over its critics; and Michael Merrick argues that Catholic commentators must be careful not to demonise the Left. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 09.12.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Catholic peer John Gummer takes on Cardinal Pell over climate change; Fr Kevin Doran, secretary general of the 50th International Eucharistic Congress, says the gathering will renew the Church in Ireland; and Rory Fitzgerald talks to Ryan Bomberger, the Emmy Award-winning designer highlighting the impact of abortion on black Americans. Milo Yiannopoulos, meanwhile, offers 10 ways to help others through the financial crisis.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 02.12.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, US presidential challenger Pat Buchanan says western civilisation needs a new St Paul; Miguel Cullen meets Nanni Moretti, the director of a papal conclave comedy that has won a cardinal’s blessing; Sister Janet Fearns writes about religious in Ethiopia helping babies see their second birthday; Fr Anthony Symondson SJ hails Stephen Dykes Bower, the last Gothic master; and Stuart Reid meets an unlikely new traditionalist. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 25.11.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, we print an exclusive extract from Archbishop Nichols’s new book on St John Fisher; Fr Christopher Jamison argues that banking needs a Wilberforce; Theodore Dalrymple laments a modern cult of ugliness; and Magnus Macfarlane-Barrow explains how his charity Mary’s Meals was inspired by Medjugorje. Plus, each paper comes with an extra, 20-page Advent magazine, with contributions from ICEL director Fr Andrew Wadsworth and composer James MacMillan. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 18.11.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Lord Carlile says that every school should learn from the scandal at Ealing; Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith asks if Catholicism is bad for the economy; Caroline Farrow says Catholic women need thick skins online; and Caroline Asquith argues that there is a blind spot among scholars about Shakespeare’s Catholic faith. Fr Anthony Symondson, meanwhile, visits the National Gallery’s once-in-a-lifetime Leonardo da Vinci show.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 11.11.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Edward Pentin meets Nigel Baker, Britain’s new ambassador to the Holy See; Fr Ronald Rolheiser writes about the fear of death; Melanie McDonagh says Ireland is treating Rome like Tehran, and Robin Harris, author of a new history of the Conservative Party, says Cameron’s honeymoon with the Church is over. Freddy Gray, meanwhile, wonders if we are nicer than our ancestors.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 04.11.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, historian Felipe Fernández-Armesto argues that democracies have a lust for bloodshed; screenwriter Frank Cottrell Boyce praises Newman’s creative genius; Cardinal Renato Martino talks to Ed West about his efforts to prevent two Gulf Wars; and John Gummer says the reform of the Act of Settlement does not go far enough. Joseph Pearce, meanwhile, says Hollywood should keep its hands off Shakespeare. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 28.10.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Fr James Martin SJ writes about the Gospel passage where joy almost leaps off the page; Lord Nicholas Windsor calls for a ‘Manhattan Project for life’ to find new ways to deal with unwanted pregnancies; Daniel Kawczynski MP says Libya owes Britain a great debt; and Melanie McDonagh says that even in Ireland Halloween has turned into a chocolate gore fest. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 18.10.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Peter Ackroyd talks to John Hinton about the shock of the Reformation; Eamon Duffy writes about Gregory VII, the German pope who took on a secular world; and Conrad Black says the conversion of Blessed John Henry Newman was like a rock thrown into the Victorian pond. Plus, conductor Marin Alsop explains how she is inspired by St Joan of Arc; and James Delingpole says Cardinal Pell is right about climate change alarmists. You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.