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Print edition 05.08.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, we publish for the first time the memoir of a nun who survived the atomic bomb; Mark Dowd describes sharing the last day on earth of a man executed for murder; Milo Yiannopoulos urges the bishops to overhaul their website; and Mary O’Regan meets the man who masterminded a bloggers’ conference at the Vatican. Piers Paul Read, meanwhile, says that Anders Breivik is a world apart from the real Templars.

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Print edition 29.07.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Fr Christopher Jamison reveals the secret of happiness; Paul Johnson explains why he loved working for the News of the World; Ed West argues that the EU is pushing Europeans apart; and James Preece says devotional life can begin when we are in nappies. Meanwhile, Mgr Andrew Wadsworth, executive director of ICEL, says the new Mass translation will expose all English-speaking Catholics to a precious tradition: Gregorian chant.

You can read it all online by subscribing here. Or, for a hard copy, go here.

Print edition 22.07.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is only available to subscribers.

This week, Catholic MP Daniel Kawczynski explains why he lobbied the PM to oust Gaddafi; Mary Kenny defends David and Victoria Beckham against ill-wishers who say they have too many children; and Archbishop Stack and former editors of The Catholic Herald pay tribute to the late Otto Herschan, managing director of the paper for nearly 50 years. Meanwhile, Fr Ronald Rolheiser says that, even though he has been diagnosed with cancer, faith and hope are flooding into his life.

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Print edition 15.07.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, Luke Coppen speaks to former Telegraph editor Charles Moore about supporting the ordinariate; Mark Dowd flies to Texas for one last conversation with a man about to be executed; Jim Dobbin says the BBC’s tactics on euthanasia are ‘reminiscent of a totalitarian state’; and Michael Coren, in an extract from his new book, explains why Catholics are always right. Edward Leigh, meanwhile, challenges Cameron to keep his promise on marriage, and Stuart Reid says Murdoch was once a standard-issue Left-liberal.

Print edition 08.07.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, Mark Greaves travels to Italy to witness the making of the new Missal; Angelo Stagnaro visits the resting place of Blessed Bartolo Longo, the Satanist on the path to sainthood; artist David Clayton writes about a Catholic college so traditional it even has medieval guilds; and James MacMillan suggests the creation of a new pontifical institute could mark the end of bad church music. Pastor Iuventus, meanwhile, has a visit from Terry Wogan.

Print edition 01.07.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, Fr Anthony Symondson and David V Barrett are inspired by the British Museum’s once-in-a-lifetime exhibition of relics and reliquaries; Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith questions the morality of plastic surgery; and Fr Ian Hellyer tells Jack Carrigan of his joy at joining his wife and nine children across the Tiber. Meanwhile, Joseph Shaw, chairman of the Latin Mass Society, says traditionalists do not want to reconstruct the 1950s – just to reconnect with a time-honoured liturgical tradition.

Print edition 24.6.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week the Apostolic Nuncio, Archbishop Mennini, says Eucharistic adoration is the key to discerning a vocation; Christopher Howse goes on pilgrimage to Spain; Mary Craig writes about the blessings of her unknowable son, diagnosed with ‘gargoylism’; and head teacher John Cosgrove argues that our schools must open up to more non-Catholics. Stuart Reid, meanwhile, asks where Pro Ecclesia went wrong; and Pastor Iuventus celebrates Mass in St Thomas More’s cell.

Print edition 17.06.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, historian Paul Badde reports on an encounter with the oldest surviving image of Christ; Melanie McDonagh asks if it is possible to be both a Catholic and a feminist; permanent deacon Sean Loone reflects on the meaning of fatherhood; and Stuart Reid says that opposing euthanasia is the easy bit. Damian Thompson, meanwhile, writes about Mapledurham House, Catholic England’s best-kept secret.

Print edition 10.06.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, John Pontifex reports from Cairo on Egypt’s embattled Christians; Philip Booth says the Church should be wary of David Cameron’s ‘wellbeing agenda’; James Knott talks to Michael Questier, the professor offering fresh insights on the brutal death of Margaret Clitherow; and Natasha Collins explains how cooking lessons with her chef father changed her life. Stuart Reid, meanwhile, attends an Extraordinary Form Mass with a female altar server.

Print edition 03.06.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, Anna Arco writes about the joys of reporting on the Church under Benedict XVI; Jerome di Costanzo laments the return of a damaging heresy; Bishop David McGough says Ascension offers a new beginning; Eric Hester suggests that a Catholic exam would ensure that pupils left school knowing the faith; and John Hinton reviews a masterly new biography of Bismarck. Katy Hounsell-Robert, meanwhile, meets Mark Cazalet, the painter who shows Christ in the everyday bustle of the modern city.