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Print edition 08.07.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, Mark Greaves travels to Italy to witness the making of the new Missal; Angelo Stagnaro visits the resting place of Blessed Bartolo Longo, the Satanist on the path to sainthood; artist David Clayton writes about a Catholic college so traditional it even has medieval guilds; and James MacMillan suggests the creation of a new pontifical institute could mark the end of bad church music. Pastor Iuventus, meanwhile, has a visit from Terry Wogan.

Print edition 01.07.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, Fr Anthony Symondson and David V Barrett are inspired by the British Museum’s once-in-a-lifetime exhibition of relics and reliquaries; Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith questions the morality of plastic surgery; and Fr Ian Hellyer tells Jack Carrigan of his joy at joining his wife and nine children across the Tiber. Meanwhile, Joseph Shaw, chairman of the Latin Mass Society, says traditionalists do not want to reconstruct the 1950s – just to reconnect with a time-honoured liturgical tradition.

Print edition 24.6.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week the Apostolic Nuncio, Archbishop Mennini, says Eucharistic adoration is the key to discerning a vocation; Christopher Howse goes on pilgrimage to Spain; Mary Craig writes about the blessings of her unknowable son, diagnosed with ‘gargoylism’; and head teacher John Cosgrove argues that our schools must open up to more non-Catholics. Stuart Reid, meanwhile, asks where Pro Ecclesia went wrong; and Pastor Iuventus celebrates Mass in St Thomas More’s cell.

Print edition 17.06.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, historian Paul Badde reports on an encounter with the oldest surviving image of Christ; Melanie McDonagh asks if it is possible to be both a Catholic and a feminist; permanent deacon Sean Loone reflects on the meaning of fatherhood; and Stuart Reid says that opposing euthanasia is the easy bit. Damian Thompson, meanwhile, writes about Mapledurham House, Catholic England’s best-kept secret.

Print edition 10.06.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, John Pontifex reports from Cairo on Egypt’s embattled Christians; Philip Booth says the Church should be wary of David Cameron’s ‘wellbeing agenda’; James Knott talks to Michael Questier, the professor offering fresh insights on the brutal death of Margaret Clitherow; and Natasha Collins explains how cooking lessons with her chef father changed her life. Stuart Reid, meanwhile, attends an Extraordinary Form Mass with a female altar server.

Print edition 03.06.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, Anna Arco writes about the joys of reporting on the Church under Benedict XVI; Jerome di Costanzo laments the return of a damaging heresy; Bishop David McGough says Ascension offers a new beginning; Eric Hester suggests that a Catholic exam would ensure that pupils left school knowing the faith; and John Hinton reviews a masterly new biography of Bismarck. Katy Hounsell-Robert, meanwhile, meets Mark Cazalet, the painter who shows Christ in the everyday bustle of the modern city.

Print edition 27.05.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, Mark Greaves speaks to Japan’s only married priest, Fr Satoru Kato, about his journey from Buddhism to Catholicism via John Henry Newman and the Oxford Movement; Clare Walker, president of the Catholic Medical Association, says Catholics should not leave it to the hierarchy to speak up about euthanasia in the NHS; and Pastor Iuventus warns about the dangers of virtual Christianity. Patrick Reyntiens, meanwhile, marvels at Miró; and Stuart Reid considers female servers at Extraordinary Form Masses.

Print edition 20.05.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, we report in full on the bishops’ decision to restore meatless Fridays; former Herald director Otto Herschan recalls keeping cardinals on their toes; Carolyn Reynier meets the Welsh parish priest of Saint-Tropez; and Pastor Iuventus answers the question: ‘What is the meaning of life for you?’ Fr Z, meanwhile, defends the new translation of the Nicene Creed; and Stuart Reid remembers the atrocities of the Spanish Civil War.

Print edition 13.05.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, Timothy Tindal-Robertson writes about John Paul II and the meaning of Fatima; Fr Tim Gardner OP, on the 120th anniversary of Rerum Novarum, says the encyclical continues to inspire activists in Britain; composer James MacMillan tells Michael White that he would rather leave the world of opera than have to write a piece about Diana; and William Oddie predicts that Fr Ian Ker’s biography of GK Chesterton will last generations. Stuart Reid, meanwhile, reports from the ‘alternative blognic’ in Rome.

Print edition 06.05.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, we have five pages of photos and reports from the beatification of Pope John Paul II; Miguel Cullen talks to actor and director Emilio Estevez, whose new film features his father, Martin Sheen, on a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela; Sister Janet Fearns hails the Red Box, an enduring symbol of Catholic generosity; and Francis Davis urges Britain’s bishops to take the lead in a civic revolution. Robin Baird-Smith, meanwhile, says the royal wedding filled him with hope.