Mon 21st Jul 2014 | Last updated: Sun 20th Jul 2014 at 22:49pm

Facebook Logo Twitter Logo RSS Logo
Hot Topics

Print edition 18.03.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week, Bishop Mark Davies of Shrewsbury reviews the Pope’s masterly new book; Fr Ashley Beck argues that Church teaching can help doctors make hard decisions about costs; Damian Arnold meets Robert Colquhoun, the 28-year-old leading a thriving pro-life campaign in London; and Edmund Matyjaszek says that Walsingham is becoming a focus of Christian unity 950 years after Our Lady appeared there in a vision. Fr John Zuhlsdorf, meanwhile, explains one of the most striking changes in the new Mass translation, “And with your spirit”.

Print edition 11.03.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week Paschal Uche says that, six months after he addressed the Pope outside Westminster Cathedral, the papal visit still inspires him; lawyer Duncan McNair explains what was at stake in a landmark ruling on Ireland’s abortion laws; Mary O’Regan salutes a feisty saint who scared pagans with bees; Jonathan Wright reports on ‘neurotheology’; and Fr Andrew Burnham, in his Lenten series, reflects on the rise of secularism. Stuart Reid, meanwhile, explains why he is giving up blogs for Lent.

Print edition 04.03.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – news, features, comment, letters and reviews – is not available online.

This week barrister Neil Addison argues that Cameron is about to open a Pandora’s box on marriage; Vatican watcher Edward Pentin says Regensburg still haunts Catholic-Muslim relations; and Fr Andrew Burnham, former Anglican bishop and member of Britain’s ordinariate, starts a series of Lenten reflections. Meanwhile, the Herald’s Spiritual Life section gains two new features: Fr John Zuhlsdorf, the world’s leading priest-blogger, begins a column on the new Mass translation; and the team behind Magnificat offer reflections on daily Mass readings.

Print edition 25.02.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week Phoebe Greenwood meets Fr Jorge Hernandez, the only priest in Gaza, along with his beleaguered and defiant flock; Mark Greaves speaks to Paul Maynard, a young Catholic MP with cerebral palsy; Charley James, a victim of abuse, writes about overcoming fear, shame and distrust with the help of clergy; and Ryan Service offers tips on how to improve a parish newsletter. Stuart Reid, meanwhile, finds out if ‘clown Masses’ are an urban myth, and Fr Robert Barron considers exorcism at the cinema.

Print edition 18.02.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week Anna Arco speaks to Fr Keith Newton, the head of the world’s first Personal Ordinariate, about his passion for Africa and his hopes for Christian unity; Maureen Lipman salutes the brave monks of Tibhirine, killed by extremists in Algeria; and home baker Andrew M Brown urges Christians to take bread seriously. Stuart Reid, meanwhile, thinks about lying, and the ethics of pro-life group Live Action; while Ed West discovers that Humanists had a ‘Benedict bounce’ too.

Print edition 11.02.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week Anthony Hopkins tells Gabrielle Donnelly why he could never be an atheist; Scott P Richert addresses the ‘everyone else is going up, so I will too’ approach to Holy Communion; John Wilkins wonders why Catholics are so uncharitable online; and Eldred Willey reports on the quiet miracles happening in ‘Africa’s Medjugorje’. Plus, Stuart Reid confronts his fear of garlic; and Andrew M Brown gives the Coen brothers’ True Grit remake a rare five stars.

Print edition 04.02.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week, Archbishop Patrick Kelly of Liverpool explains why children in his archdiocese will be confirmed before their first Holy Communion; retired headmaster John de Waal argues that the pro-life movement is in danger of failing the unborn; Quentin de la Bédoyère says the TV series, The Joy of Teen Sex, does a big injustice to young people; and Deborah Jones argues that Benedict XVI’s childhood in the countryside in Bavaria has left a deep imprint on his thinking. Plus, Angelo Stagnaro hangs on for dear life 1,200ft above a small town in Umbria.

Print edition 28.01.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week, Peter Mullen, rector of St Michael’s in the City, explains that even though he loves the Pope, he won’t be joining the ordinariate; George Weigel writes about the parallel lives of John Paul II and Ronald Reagan; Huw Twiston Davies talks to Fr Samir Khalil Samir, the leading Catholic expert on Islam, about tensions between Egypt and the Holy See; and Jane Fae considers the Church’s response to people who think they were born with the wrong gender. Stuart Reid, meanwhile, wonders if a royal marriage is valid without the presence of a Dimbleby.

Print edition 21.01.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week, one of the west’s leading Muslim scholars, Abdal Hakim Murad, offers his perspective on violence against Christians in the Middle East; Léonie Caldecott recalls the happiest day of Pope John Paul II’s life; pro-life MP Nadine Dorries says churches have been pathetic in the fight to reform abortion law; and Stuart Reid writes about the love that Dorothy Day gave up to follow Christ. Plus, we report on the disclosure by White Stripes singer Jack White that he once considered the priesthood.

Print edition 14.01.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week, we report on the campaign to stop the closure of Ushaw College; Huw Twiston Davies talks to Archbishop Michael Fitzgerald, Apostolic Nuncio to Egypt, about the country’s embattled Christians; and Peter Newsham reports on how Copts are flourishing in a former karaoke pub in London. Magnus Macfarlane-Brown, chief executive of Mary’s Meals, writes about tackling the enormity of suffering in Haiti; and Will Heaven says The King’s Speech makes him want to wave his Union Jack like a maniac.