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Print edition 04.02.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week, Archbishop Patrick Kelly of Liverpool explains why children in his archdiocese will be confirmed before their first Holy Communion; retired headmaster John de Waal argues that the pro-life movement is in danger of failing the unborn; Quentin de la Bédoyère says the TV series, The Joy of Teen Sex, does a big injustice to young people; and Deborah Jones argues that Benedict XVI’s childhood in the countryside in Bavaria has left a deep imprint on his thinking. Plus, Angelo Stagnaro hangs on for dear life 1,200ft above a small town in Umbria.

Print edition 28.01.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week, Peter Mullen, rector of St Michael’s in the City, explains that even though he loves the Pope, he won’t be joining the ordinariate; George Weigel writes about the parallel lives of John Paul II and Ronald Reagan; Huw Twiston Davies talks to Fr Samir Khalil Samir, the leading Catholic expert on Islam, about tensions between Egypt and the Holy See; and Jane Fae considers the Church’s response to people who think they were born with the wrong gender. Stuart Reid, meanwhile, wonders if a royal marriage is valid without the presence of a Dimbleby.

Print edition 21.01.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week, one of the west’s leading Muslim scholars, Abdal Hakim Murad, offers his perspective on violence against Christians in the Middle East; Léonie Caldecott recalls the happiest day of Pope John Paul II’s life; pro-life MP Nadine Dorries says churches have been pathetic in the fight to reform abortion law; and Stuart Reid writes about the love that Dorothy Day gave up to follow Christ. Plus, we report on the disclosure by White Stripes singer Jack White that he once considered the priesthood.

Print edition 14.01.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week, we report on the campaign to stop the closure of Ushaw College; Huw Twiston Davies talks to Archbishop Michael Fitzgerald, Apostolic Nuncio to Egypt, about the country’s embattled Christians; and Peter Newsham reports on how Copts are flourishing in a former karaoke pub in London. Magnus Macfarlane-Brown, chief executive of Mary’s Meals, writes about tackling the enormity of suffering in Haiti; and Will Heaven says The King’s Speech makes him want to wave his Union Jack like a maniac.

Print edition 07.01.11

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week, we report on the bomb attack that killed two dozen Coptic Christians in Egypt; Jonathan Wright hails the King James Bible on its 400th anniversary year; Pastor Juventus says the feast of Epiphany feels like a phantom limb; Simon Caldwell discovers how the print revolution unleashed a wave of anti-Catholic propaganda; and Stuart Reid makes a resolution never to look at Sedevacantist websites before breakfast. Plus, Charlie Hegarty recalls Hitler’s visit to Oberammergau.

Print edition 24.12.10

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week, Anna Arco talks to Archbishop Bernard Longley about his first year at Birmingham; Conrad Black enjoys Tony Blair’s book A Journey; and Transalpine Redemptorist Fr Michael Mary writes about Christmas amid the ice and wind in Orkney. Plus, we publish an extra 16-page Christmastide supplement featuring star writers such as Fr Robert Barron, Tracey Rowland, and Fr Tim Finigan.

Print edition 17.12.10

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week, we report on America’s first approved visionary; David E Norris marvels at the dazzlingly inventive cribs which are carried through Kraków; Mark Banks argues that Hollywood’s Christians are heading for a breakthrough; and Fr Michael G Murphy explains why many US Catholics thought of Cardinal Newman as a saint long before he was made Blessed. Stuart Reid, meanwhile, considers the morality of Strictly Come Dancing.

Print edition 10.12.10

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week, Vatican correspondent Edward Pentin reports on the Pope’s choice of nuncio for Britain; Fr James Hanvey continues his series of Advent reflections; and Mary O’Regan argues that Ireland should have listened to John Paul II before joining the euro. Plus, Simon Caldwell praises the new Narnia film, and Jack Carrigan reviews Light of the World, Peter Seewald’s interview with Benedict XVI. Pastor Juventus, meanwhile, considers donning a sandwich board for Advent.

Print edition 3.12.10

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week, Andrew M Brown reviews of Gods and Men, a strikingly moving French film about the last months of Cistercian monks who were killed in Algeria. Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith explores the significance of the Holy Father’s remarks on condom use, and John Hinton reviews a book about Joseph Goebbels, the would-be priest who built Hitler’s myth. Robin Baird-Smith, meanwhile, says that rage can be good for us.

Print edition 26.11.10

Much of The Catholic Herald’s content – letters, reviews, news, extra comment and features – is not available online.

This week, Fr James Hanvey SJ begins his Advent reflections. On the 30th anniversary of Dorothy Day’s death, Fr Ashley Beck looks at the fiery activist’s life; John Hinton reviews a book about the Quaker chocolate empires and Fr Adrian Graffy unpacks the Apostolic Exhortation Verbum Domini. Robin Baird-Smith, meanwhile, ruminates on the value of silence.