Sat 19th Apr 2014 | Last updated: Fri 18th Apr 2014 at 22:16pm

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Print edition 08.02.13

This week, we introduce our new cartoonist, Christian Adams; composer James MacMillan writes about his struggle to save a friend from execution; Melanie McDonagh ponders Jane Austen’s faith; Daniel Kalder explains why the CIA is known as “Catholics In Action”; a Jesuit from Haiti tells Ed West his country will never give in to despair; and Madeleine Teahan says more and more young Catholics are turning to the web in search of love. Plus, well-known Christians, including Ann Widdecombe, Julie Etchingham, Archbishop Nichols and Frank Cottrell Boyce, tell us what they plan to give up for Lent.

You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 01.02.13

This week, Freddy Gray has a transcendental episode in Jerusalem; Mgr Keith Newton says the ordinariate is surviving on faith alone; Tim Stanley reports on the Catholics who back the death penalty; John Tabor hails the saintly French geneticist who risked his career defending the lives of children with Down’s syndrome; Rory Fitzgerald meets a ‘card-toting reductive materialist’ who found God after a near-death experience; and Lizzy Bell reports on the lessons of a dry January.

You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 25.01.13

This week, Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone of San Francisco tells Mary O’Regan we can achieve ‘spiritual greatness’ in the fight for marriage; Cristina Odone gives her advice to parents worried about cyberspace; Jack Scarisbrick says a civilised society doesn’t keep tiny human beings in deep freezers; Alexander Jolliffe writes about how to overcome redundancy; Jim Connor recalls an encounter with a Bond villain; and Dennis Sewell investigates whether atheists are cleverer than believers. Meanwhile Will Gore assesses Lincoln, and Ed West hails King Athelstan.

You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 18.01.13

This week, Stuart Reid says Bishop Fellay is making life hard for SSPX faithful; Wm Paul Young tells Will Gore that his bestselling novel The Shack was inspired by a deep personal crisis; Jean Mercier explains that France has some surprising defenders of traditional marriage; poet Edmund Matyjaszek marks the ordinariate’s second birthday; Neville Kyrke-Smith reports on deepening ties with the Orthodox in Russia; and Piers Paul Read considers why Catholics have forgotten about hell.

You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 11.01.13

This week, Madeleine Teahan meets Eve Farren, the 22-year-old helping pro-lifers navigate the jungle of student politics; Les Misérables inspires Quentin Falk and Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith; James Le Fanu praises the humble crow; and Alice Warrender says she found peace of mind when she walked alone for more than 1,000 miles from Canterbury to Rome. Andrew M Brown, meanwhile, asks if the BBC will take God out of G K Chesterton’s Father Brown stories.

You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 04.01.13

This week, John Bird, founder of the Big Issue, gives his manifesto for ending poverty; actor Mark Williams tells Will Gore about playing G K Chesterton detective Father Brown in a new BBC series; Tim Stanley predicts a hard Islamist winter; Mark Greaves meets an ex-soldier traumatised by war who is now counselling others; and Quentin de la Bédoyère publishes a letter to his cohabiting grandson. Plus, Will Heaven explains why he will be singing in the bath in 2013.

You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 21.12.12

In our Christmas double issue, Luke Coppen meets Bishop Mark Davies; Mary O’Regan speaks to Archbishop Gerhard Müller, prefect of the CDF; and Gabrielle Donnelly talks about Catholicism and kindness with the actor Liam Neeson. Meanwhile, in an extract from his book, Pope Benedict XVI explores the rich meaning of the stable; Fr James Martin SJ reflects on Joseph; Tim Stanley writes about the radical message of Christmas; Stuart Reid praises Dorothy Day; and Freddy Gray urges Catholics not to be stingy on presents.

You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

Print edition 14.12.12

Only a small selection of stories from the print edition of The Catholic Herald is published online for free. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

This week, Cardinal Scola tells Luke Coppen that the controversy over the Pope’s Regensburg lecture has made dialogue with Muslims easier; Mark Shea says US drone strikes are claiming innocent lives; Jenny McCartney laments the loss of the ‘Just say no’ message on drugs; and Lisa Green says that caring for Raphael, her terminally ill baby, was the most precious time of her life. Plus, Lord Deben argues that the women bishops saga proves St Thomas More was right about Parliament.

Print edition 07.12.12

Only a small selection of stories from the print edition of The Catholic Herald is published online for free. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

This week, novelist Matt Thorne suggests Mary Whitehouse was the greatest 1970s rebel; Rory Fitzgerald argues that abortion campaigners have spun a false narrative over Savita’s sad death; William Oddie assesses the Pope’s new book; Mgr Andrew Wadsworth marks the new Mass translation’s first birthday; and Daniel Kalder ponders the end of the world.

Print edition 30.11.12

Only a small selection of stories from the print edition of The Catholic Herald is published online for free. You can read it all online by subscribing here (for £40 a year). Or, for a hard copy, go here (£75 for a year’s worth).

This week, Stuart Reid meets Fr Stephen Langridge, the priest who doubled his congregation and is inspiring new vocations; Joseph Pearce says JRR Tolkien’s The Hobbit contains a profoundly Catholic message; Melanie McDonagh argues that the C of E’s umbilical tie to the state looks more like a noose; and Fr Tim Finigan explains what the Church asks Catholics to believe, and what beliefs are, in fact, optional. Meanwhile, in our free 20-page supplement, writers in Bethlehem, Turkey and Lebanon guide you through Advent.